Alternative Metal

MetalMusicArchives.com — the ultimate metal music online community, from the creators of progarchives.com

Alternative metal is a genre of heavy metal that gained popularity in the early 1990s. Most notably, alternative metal bands are characterized by heavy guitar riffs; typically, these riffs have a pronounced experimental edge, including unconventional lyrics, odd time signatures, more syncopation than typical metal, unusual technique, a resistance to conventional approaches to heavy music and an incorporation of a wide range of influences outside of the metal music scene.

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alternative_Metal

Sub-genre collaborators:
  • mlkpad14

alternative metal top albums

Showing only albums and EPs | Based on members ratings & MMA custom algorithm | 24 hours caching

ALICE IN CHAINS Dirt Album Cover Dirt
ALICE IN CHAINS
4.51 | 104 ratings
Buy this album from MMA partners
FAITH NO MORE Angel Dust Album Cover Angel Dust
FAITH NO MORE
4.40 | 82 ratings
Buy this album from MMA partners
TOOL Ænima Album Cover Ænima
TOOL
4.20 | 79 ratings
Buy this album from MMA partners
SOUNDGARDEN Badmotorfinger Album Cover Badmotorfinger
SOUNDGARDEN
4.18 | 61 ratings
Buy this album from MMA partners
SYSTEM OF A DOWN Toxicity Album Cover Toxicity
SYSTEM OF A DOWN
4.15 | 93 ratings
Buy this album from MMA partners
MUDVAYNE L.D. 50 Album Cover L.D. 50
MUDVAYNE
4.30 | 16 ratings
Buy this album from MMA partners
KATATONIA The Fall Of Hearts Album Cover The Fall Of Hearts
KATATONIA
4.29 | 16 ratings
Buy this album from MMA partners
FAITH NO MORE The Real Thing Album Cover The Real Thing
FAITH NO MORE
4.11 | 72 ratings
Buy this album from MMA partners
KATATONIA Viva Emptiness Album Cover Viva Emptiness
KATATONIA
4.16 | 32 ratings
Buy this album from MMA partners
TREMONTI All I Was Album Cover All I Was
TREMONTI
4.50 | 6 ratings
Buy this album from MMA partners
DEFTONES White Pony Album Cover White Pony
DEFTONES
4.17 | 17 ratings
Buy this album from MMA partners
SYSTEM OF A DOWN Mezmerize Album Cover Mezmerize
SYSTEM OF A DOWN
4.06 | 57 ratings
Buy this album from MMA partners
This list is in progress since the site is new. We invite all logged in members to use the "quick rating" widget (stars bellow album covers) or post full reviews to increase the weight of your rating in the global average value (see FAQ for more details). Enjoy MMA!

alternative metal online videos

alternative metal New Releases

.. Album Cover
B: The Beginning - The Image Album
Album
MARTY FRIEDMAN
Buy this album from MMA partners
.. Album Cover
Lives
Single
SCARS ON BROADWAY
Buy this album from MMA partners
.. Album Cover
All I See is War
Album
SEVENDUST
Buy this album from MMA partners
.. Album Cover
Quick and Dirty
Boxset / Compilation
TAD
Buy this album from MMA partners
.. Album Cover
What It Is
Single
JONATHAN DAVIS
Buy this album from MMA partners
.. Album Cover
Black Labyrinth
Album
JONATHAN DAVIS
Buy this album from MMA partners
.. Album Cover
Of Jupiter And Moons
Album
TEMPERANCE
Buy this album from MMA partners
.. Album Cover
When Legends Rise
Album
GODSMACK
Buy this album from MMA partners
.. Album Cover
Pike 274 - Fourneau Cosmique
Album
BUCKETHEAD
Buy this album from MMA partners
.. Album Cover
Ember
Album
BREAKING BENJAMIN
Buy this album from MMA partners
.. Album Cover
Automata: Part 1
Album
BETWEEN THE BURIED AND ME
Buy this album from MMA partners
.. Album Cover
Too Far Gone
Album
CANE HILL
Buy this album from MMA partners
.. Album Cover
Red Cold River
Single
BREAKING BENJAMIN
Buy this album from MMA partners

alternative metal Music Reviews

DISTURBED Ten Thousand Fists

Album · 2005 · Alternative Metal
Cover art Buy this album from MMA partners
martindavey87
Disturbed’s third studio album, 2005’s ‘Ten Thousand Fists’, sees the band finally hit their stride, adapting a more contemporary sound while somewhat maintaining their groove-based nu metal style. With that particular subgenre of music being dead and buried, this was a pivotal album for the band to show that they could hold their own outside of that scene, with an album that would appeal to fans of metal old and new alike.

Having focused on the highlights of their previous releases, catchy choruses in particular, ‘Ten Thousand Fists’ has an abundance of hooks that makes every track memorable, and with its monstrous production and simple song structures, Disturbed’s music sounds a lot more accessible and mainstream.

Guitarist Dan Donegan’s guitar playing is brilliant here. With skull-crushing precision, his riffs are heavy, yet groovy, and fit perfectly with David Draiman’s melodic vocals. In fact, Donegan lets rip in a couple of tracks with some very slick guitar solos, showing that he had the chops all along, but either left them out to further conform to nu metal trends, or simply that there was no need for them. Either way, he’s finally cutting loose, and it sounds great!

Highlights include the thunderous hit single ‘Stricken’, the huge and epic-sounding ‘Overburdened, and a cracking cover of the Genesis classic, ‘Land of Confusion’, as well as ‘Just Stop’, ‘Guarded’, ‘Sacred Lie’, and ‘Pain Redefined’. And then of course, the title track itself, which is an absolute anthem that will literally produce a sea of raised fists for a metal call-to-arms. The musicianship on these tracks is fantastic, with exceptional performances from everyone involved.

Overall, while ‘Ten Thousand Fists’ isn’t quite a masterpiece, it’s a solid album that definitely helped Disturbed shake off any nu metal remnants, and established them as a legit heavy metal act. It holds up well today, and marks the band as one of the more important acts to burst onto the scene at the turn of the century.

CLAWFINGER Use Your Brain

Album · 1995 · Rap Metal
Cover art Buy this album from MMA partners
martindavey87
1995’s ‘Use Your Brain’ is the second album by Swedish rap rockers Clawfinger. It follows in the same vein as its predecessor, ‘Deaf Dumb Blind’, with similar compositions and a nearly identical sound, but it seems to lack the same youthful exuberance that made the latter such an engaging listen.

Mixing rapping vocals with metal guitar riffs long before the likes of Limp Bizkit and Linkin Park gained worldwide fame, Clawfinger’s groove-laden music has always been about uncompromising, in-your-face attitude. With a dirty, gritty sound, and lyrics that spit in the face of political correctness, they’ve never been afraid to put themselves on the line.

Utilizing simple, yet striking guitar work with electronic samples, the band have an effective and fairly distinctive sound. Vocalist Zak Tell’s rapid fire delivery, which blends rapping with hardcore and punk rock elements, goes well with the music, and certainly paints a picture of an angry and frustrated band.

But unfortunately, ‘Use Your Brain’ just simply isn’t as good as the band’s debut. While it’s not a bad album, ‘Deaf Dumb Blind’ was consistently strong throughout, while here, we’re treated to a few moments of sheer genius being smothered by an abundance of filler material. But despite the weaker tracks, songs like ‘Power’, ‘Die High’, ‘Do What I Say’ and ‘Pay the Bill’ are all strong enough to stand next to anything the band have done before, and are all good reasons to at least give this album a chance.

KATATONIA The Fall Of Hearts

Album · 2016 · Alternative Metal
Cover art Buy this album from MMA partners
Necrotica
A common thread you wind up finding in every Katatonia album is that every one of them exhibits a different kind of melancholy. Each expression of that one emotion changes with each stylistic shift or altered lyrical approach, but either way, the melancholy still returns in some way. Perhaps it comes in the form of desperate wails and screams over crushing doom-laden riffs (Dance of December Souls). Maybe it can be found in gritty imagery involving the ills of crime and street life (Viva Emptiness). Alternately, the looming darkness of orchestral strings and mellotrons could seal the deal (Dead End Kings). But when it comes to The Fall of Hearts, the dreary atmosphere is expressed somewhat… differently. It might come down to a lack of metal influences this time around, but there’s an unusually surreal and dreamlike touch to the music. The songs are sad, yes, but also given a sort of levity and weightlessness by the shimmering clean guitars and light piano melodies that coil around the increasingly progressive rhythms. Jonas Renkse has channeled his sorrows through more passionate vocal passages (just listen to the chorus of “Last Song Before the Fade”!) while the music surrounding him has become more abstract compared to past efforts.

Really, I wouldn’t have it any other way. It’s not like this progressive influence is just out of the blue; the last few records, especially Dead End Kings, were already hinting at this bold new direction. But I suppose the fascinating thing about The Fall of Hearts is just how well they pulled off those influences. Instead of the crunchy, churning alternative metal riffs that dominated a good chunk of the band’s career, there’s now more respect and care given to the atmosphere than ever before. If you ever hear a downtuned metal riff (“Takeover,” “Passer,” “Serac,” and “Last Song Before the Fade” still bring the heaviness to a degree), you can be sure that a beautiful slow passage will be just around the corner to counteract the aggression. “Serac,” for instance, brings a fresh melding of progressive metal and soft rock that’s not too dissimilar to Opeth’s best works from the early 2000s (minus the growls, of course). Then you have “Passer,” which kicks off with a shredding guitar solo over a rapid-fire galloping snare rhythm before it almost immediately dies down to give us one of the most emotionally potent verses the band have ever concocted. It’s not that the band have lost their edge, but that they simply reserved it for the best moments this time around. And really, a lot of that can be attributed to the fact that Katatonia didn’t really subscribe to a set songwriting formula this time around. The arrangements are quite labyrinthine and unpredictable compared to what we’re used to from these guys, and the opening 7-minute track “Takeover” is an immediate example of this. This mini-epic takes you in so many directions in such little time, from a beautiful dreamlike intro/refrain to a rousing metal section to a deeply orchestral chorus to a stunning piano break. Add to that a killer guitar solo from newcomer Roger Ojersson on top of that, and you’ve got one of the best openers in recent memory.

In fact, let’s talk about those newcomers for a second. Guitarist Roger Ojersson and drummer Daniel Moilanen were a huge asset to the sound The Fall of Hearts would ultimately adopt and cultivate, as their technical proficiency allowed the band to work outside of their typical framework a bit more. The solos in “Takeover,” “Passer,” and especially the harmonized portion of “Serac” are incredible ways to build on songwriting that already takes pride in taking listeners on a real journey. Meanwhile, Daniel absolutely kills on the drumkit. His grasp of varying time signatures and subtle dynamics is just impeccable, and he can shift styles with ease to fit each mood perfectly. As for the songwriting, however, you may notice in the credits that it’s all Jonas Renkse and Anders Nystrom as usual. Maybe that’s the most fascinating thing about The Fall of Hearts, really. Just the fact that these two had it in them to make this record all along, but they simply needed the right circumstances and band members to make it happen. If you want a good marker of just how much they’ve evolved as songwriters, just take into account the fact that “Pale Flag” and “Shifts” are minimalist folk rock ballads with almost none of the band’s typical sonic trademarks present, and yet they’re not out of place in the slightest. But then again, nothing on The Fall of Hearts is out of place; it’s just the sound of a fully-evolved, fully-realized Katatonia that was always trying to break free from the mire of comfortable familiarity.

ADEMA Unstable

Album · 2003 · Nu Metal
Cover art Buy this album from MMA partners
martindavey87
Adema’s 2001 self-titled debut was released at a time when nu metal was one of the biggest musical genres in the world. However, it was also short-lived, and with only minor mainstream success, the band was unable to make a big enough splash to help carry them through the subgenres demise. And so by 2003, musical trends have already shifted, and the Californian five-piece would get one final chance to either release an album that’ll see them transcend the dying fad, or forever remain one of “those bands” that were good “back in the day”.

And sadly, despite a marked improvement in writing and more confident performances, ‘Unstable’ just wasn’t good enough.

Displaying a nice mixture of heavy, groove-laden and energetic tracks, with some melodic, sentimental and emotional songs, ‘Unstable’ shows a band that has really improved and matured since their last outing. Vocalist Mark Chavez (who was originally only noteworthy for being half-brother of Korn main man Jonathan Davis) has proven himself a competent frontman, and while the instrumentation is fairly straightforward, the band have become adept at using multiple layers of simple melodies to accentuate a warmth in their sound.

But with that said, there’s still only a handful of notable tracks here. ‘Unstable’, ‘So Fortunate’, ‘Co-Dependent’ and ‘Promises’ are all pretty amazing to be honest, and definitely shows a band who certainly had the potential, but sadly never lived up to it. ‘Stand Up’, ‘Blame Me’ and ‘Let Go’ are also fairly decent, but nothing worth getting overly excited about.

Much like its predecessor, ‘Unstable’ does have some moments of absolute genius, but sadly most of it gets lost amongst an abundance of fairly average songs. It’s a good album, but in 2003, with nu metal on its last legs, “good” isn’t good enough, and while it’s certainly worth a listen or two, it’d ensure that Adema will forever be nothing more than another nu metal nostalgia band.

TEMPERANCE Of Jupiter And Moons

Album · 2018 · Alternative Metal
Cover art Buy this album from MMA partners
DippoMagoo
In what has been a year full of surprises so far, it’s nice to finally have something that’s largely unsurprising, while still managing to feel refreshing and energizing at the same time. Obviously, Italian melodic metal band Temperance have been one of my favorites in their field ever since they released their self-titled debut in 2014, with their two subsequent releases only impressing me even more, to the point where they quickly became one of my favorite bands and one I could consistently depend on to deliver amazing new music within a short of amount of time. Sadly, all good things must eventually come to an end, and so just as the band had seemingly reached their peak, vocalist Chiara Tricarico and keyboardist/drummer Giulio Capone both left in between albums, leaving the two remaining members to find new bandmates and start over. Somehow, though, the band has not only continued on, but now with their new lineup they are set to release their fourth full-length album, Of Jupiter And Moons, an album that continues their streak of amazing albums, and while it’s a much different beast from its predecessor, The Earth Embraces Us All, it’s very much on the same level, and n some ways even more enjoyable and immediately engaging.

Even with a new lineup, the overall sound is still very much what Temperance fans would expect, which is to say the band plays a very modern sounding brand of melodic metal, with trance keyboards being as prominent as ever, and there’s still an emphasis on big vocal melodies and super catchy songwriting. If anything, the songwriting is a bit more straight-forward and even catchier than normal on this album, with many songs having choruses that are sure to be stuck in my head for a very long time, and the melodies are absolutely beautiful, as always. In fact, this album has some of the absolute best melodies I’ve heard on a metal album in quite some time, with everything from the keys, to the ever more prominent symphonic elements to even some of the melodic guitar leads all sounding absolutely gorgeous. At the same time, there’s definitely still some heavy guitar work at points, and the speedy power metal elements are still intact, with many of the tracks being very up-tempo and energetic. While the keyboards are still very noticeable, especially on some of the lighter and slower paced tracks, they don’t feel quite as overpowering this time around, and I definitely notice the symphonic elements even more than on the last album, with them sometimes taking over as the main element of the music, though guitars and keys are still very important throughout. The instrumental work is excellent throughout, with some very memorable solos and excellent melodies and riffs all around, and new drummer Alfonso Mocerino fits in very well, especially on the faster tracks where his drumming is very energetic. The one element that seems to be absent from this release is the melodic metalcore elements, though honestly, that was the one element I always felt could have been removed without much being lost, so its absence doesn’t bother me at all. As always, the production is flawless, and the many elements all sound powerful and perfectly clear.

The one area where I was most concerned going into this album was the vocals because Chiara was such an important part of the band, so I wasn’t sure how the band could replace her. Well, the truth is they didn’t quite replace her at all, so much as they decided to move in a slightly different direction, switching to a three-vocalist approach. While he doesn’t sing as much as before, guitarist Marco Pastorino still occasionally lends his powerful and intense voice in quick bursts, which I find to be very effective, as he uses his vocals to add some extra power and emotion near the end of tracks, most noticeably on the title track. Most male vocals, though, are handled by current Kaledon vocalist Michele Guaitoli, who has a smooth but very powerful voice, which can get a bit animated at times. He does a great job at taking lead during many tracks, but he’s at his best when singing in harmony with his co-lead, Alessia Scolletti. Speaking of which, Alessia has a very beautiful, very smooth voice, and while she often stays in the midrange and uses lighter, more pop-like vocals, she can get intense at times, providing some powerful vocals in quick bursts. The choruses are the highlight of the album, though, and during these the two often sing together in harmony, with their voices blending together perfectly and sounding amazing together. While I certainly loved Chiara’s vocals, I think the new approach works just as well, and there are certainly a ton of incredible vocal moments throughout the album, some coming from individual performances, and some coming from more of a team effort.

One area where I had very little concern but a lot of interest, was in the songwriting, which has always been one of the band’s major strengths. While the band has lost one of its main songwriters, their winning streak shows no sign of ending anytime soon, as the songwriting here is as catchy, varied and super addictive as ever. This time around, there aren’t any tracks as ambitious as the two epic-length tracks found on the previous album, but everything is consistently amazing, and if anything the shorter run time and amazing melodies and choruses help to make it an album that is easier to play repeatedly over a long period of time. It’s hard to say which approach I prefer, but either way, the band has pulled a more straight-forward approach off to perfection on this album.

Things get off to an exciting start with the stunning opening track “The Last Hope in a World of Hopes”, a track which manages to feel huge and epic, while clocking in at just under 5 minutes. The increased use of symphonic elements is noticeable right from the start, and soon they’re combined with some epic operatic vocals from the two leads in a sequence that quickly speeds up before Alessia eventually takes lead during an epic opening verse. Michele shows up again just before the chorus, and the track speeds up and goes full power for an epic, super catchy and incredibly melodic chorus, which only gets better as the song goes on. Later on, there’s an epic instrumental section where the guitar tone is absolutely beautiful, and this leads to an even more amazing final run of the chorus, that gets the album off to a flying start. The next track, “Broken Promises” is a bit more restrained at first, settling down to a more relaxing pace, with some very light vocals from Michele, but once the chorus hits it quickly picks up again and the trance elements are very noticeable on this track. The chorus is huge, easily one of the most melodic and most stupidly catchy choruses I’ve heard on a metal album in my entire life, and both singers sound amazing. While Michele leads throughout most of the track, Alessia provides some very powerful near the end of the second verse, that elevates the song to even greater heights, and then the final run through the chorus simply takes it out of this world. Probably my favorite track on the whole album, despite being mid-paced and very simple. Those melodies are simply too irresistible and both singers sound amazing.

In case the album wasn’t already off to an amazing start, the title track is up next, and it certainly keeps the momentum going. It opens with some very nice keys, before quickly speeding up, and the verses do a great job of showcasing both singers, with Alessia leading during a lighter opening verse, while Michele leads a much heavier a more intense second verse. The chorus is again amazing, but the highlight of the track is a huge vocal section near the end, where epic backing vocals are used in support of Marco, who makes his first big appearance and delivers some of the most powerful and emotional vocals I’ve ever heard from him. After that barn burner of a track, the pace slows down a bit on “Everything That I Am”, a more melodic track dominated by keyboards and symphonic elements. While it’s a fairly calm track overall, there’s some excellent guitar work in the second half, and there are some excellent melodies throughout, with both singers again delivering powerful performances, and overall it’s another excellent track. The pace quickly picks up again with “We Are Free”, a more typical sounding Temperance track, with a mix of heavy riffs, symphonic elements, trance keys and huge vocal melodies, and it’s more of a very fast paced track with some power metal elements. The chorus is excellent once again, and overall it’s a very fun and energetic track, which keeps the momentum going.

Moving into the second half, “Alive Again” is another lighter track, mostly driven by trance keys, and it’s sung entirely by Michele, who of course does a great job. It has another great chorus, though the best part is a speedy section in the second half where the music really picks up the intensity. On the flip side of that track is “The Art of Believing”, another speedier, heavier track where Alessia takes lead throughout, with male vocals mostly used in a supporting role. It’s yet another energetic track with a super catchy and memorable chorus, with great riffs and a great use of keys and symphonic elements, though its the middle section where the song really takes off, first with an awesome instrumental section that has more of a hard rock feel to it, and then Alessia delivers some of her most emotional and powerful vocals on the entire album, and the final run through the chorus is incredible, as usual. Next is “The Way Home”, another track dominated by trance keys, though it moves along at a nice pace and has some heavy guitar work at points, definitely feeling like it would have fit nicely on any of the band’s past albums. It again has nice duo vocals throughout, and it picks up the intensity as it goes along, speeding up during the second verse and getting better as it goes along, with an epic solo followed by an epic vocal section in the second half.

Nearing the end, the pace slows down one last time for the lone ballad “Empires of Men”, which is an absolute stunner of a track. The backing keys are gorgeous sounding the track is an example of minimalism at its finest, as there’s not a whole lot going on musically, but what’s there sounds beautiful, and the harmonies between the two lead singers are absolutely stunning and they only get better as the track goes on, with the final run through the chorus being absolutely incredible, and possibly the highlight of the entire album. Lastly, we have the longest track on the album, “Daruma’s Eyes (Part 1)”, another heavy and speedy track, where the keyboards have a creepy feel to them and help add a thick atmosphere to an already intense track, while the guitars provide crushing riffs and wonderful melodies in equal measure, and the symphonic elements are kicked up a notch, to help make it one heck of an epic finale. The chorus is amazing the first few times it shows up, but the final run through is by far the best, as Marco shows up again and ends the album with another absolutely brilliant and powerful performance.

I had very high expectations for Of Jupiter And Moons after its predecessor was one of my top 5 albums of 2016, and once again Temperance has managed to blow me away, producing possibly their best release to date. As always, the music represents modern melodic metal at its absolute finest, with a generous helping of power metal, trance, and symphonic elements, to go along with some incredible vocal melodies, excellent musicianship and extremely consistent and sup catchy songwriting. Even with a largely new lineup, the band is still in perfect form, and this is an album I can easily recommend to fans of any kind of melodic metal, as well as power metal fans or anyone wanting to hear some incredible vocal melodies.

originally written for myglobalmind.com: https://myglobalmind.com/2018/03/16/temperance-of-jupiter-and-moons-review/

alternative metal movie reviews

SLIPKNOT Day Of The Gusano

Movie · 2017 · Nu Metal
Cover art Buy this album from MMA partners
Kingcrimsonprog
***This review is regarding the single disc, UK Blu-Ray version only. Which contains the full uninterrupted concert only, with no special features or documentary footage.***

Now, you might be thinking ‘I’ve already got three Slipknot videos with concert footage on them’ if you already own Disasterpeices live in London from the Iowa touring cycle, (Sic)nesses live at Download festival 2009 on their first headline performance there during the All Hope Is Gone touring cycle, and the 2nd disc of the documentary release Voliminal Inside The Nine which had a smattering of live tracks from different dates and locations during the Vol. 3 touring cycle.

So what has Day Of The Gusano got to separate it from the others and make it worth buying as well? Well; first off, it is their first official concert video with the new rhythm section of Jay and Alex on drums and bass. Its their first ever show in Mexico City and the fans are energetic and grateful. Its their first video of a Knotfest performance and features all the associated spectacle and backdrops. It has songs from the .5 The Gray Chapter album, which obviously none of the previous videos will have had.

Comparing it to their other DVDs, there are 11 songs here that aren’t on Disaterpieces, including the rarely played ‘Metabolic’ off of Iowa, and ‘Me Inside’ & ‘Prosthetics’ off of the debut. There are 6 songs here that aren’t on (Sic)nesses at Download ’09. Compared to Voliminal‘s concert section, well, its a full length concert in a single location not just 9 random tracks from various locations, and none of it is in black & white.

So, onto ‘Gusano itself. (If you didn’t know already or bother to google that, its Spanish for ‘Maggots’ by the way, which makes sense, since y’know, they call their fans ‘Maggots’ and its filmed in Mexico). The audio visual quality of the release is really high. The picture quality, camera work, variety of shots, editing and general watching experience of the concert are the best that Slipknot have had to date. It is beautiful to look at, and there’s nothing distracting or interrupting about the editing. The performance visually has lots of pyro and fireworks and big backdrops and set pieces, fancy lighting. There’s generally lots going on up there on stage… its big and flashy and never boring.

The mix and production are very good. The only niggle is that Corey’s vocals are a bit lower in the mix than any previous live efforts from the band, but that’s real nitpicking. Otherwise, the instruments are really clear and well balanced, you can make the kick drum out clearly in all situations, and its even easier to hear Craig and Sid’s stuff than usual too which helps you notice them a bit better. If there’s a key riff or drum fill or whatever its given priority and generally its all beefy, heavy and just plain well put together.

The band themselves’ performance will always make or break a concert though. All the audio visual quality in the world, with the most expensive fireworks and lighting can’t hide a crappy performance. Slipknot have been through different phases in that regard. Old bootlegs off of the first album cycle show them as a sort of messy raw jumble. On Iowa they were a tight well-oiled million dollar perfect live-band (I remember seeing them live in Belfast on that cycle and its still one of my favourite ever concert experiences all these years later). On Volume 3 they flipped between the two but generally they were let down by Corey’s vocals (both times I saw them on that cycle and indeed both their 9.0 Live album and Voliminal DVD from that cycle all suffered from Corey’s vocals not being as great as usual). On All Hope‘ however, they came back blazing and were incredible and put in career defining performances and Corey sounded like one of the world’s greatest ever frontmen.

Luckily, here, the band are really on top form. This is a fiery, energetic, fun performance that everybody seems into. There are no complaints about the new line up and they do a great job of trying to fill some pretty massive, childhood-defining, shoes. (Heck, Jay arguably plays ‘Vermilion’ better live here than on any of the other three officially released versions of it). The veteran members are all super practiced, tight and precise. Corey is really strong here, arguably the second-best that he’s ever been on an official release next to Download ’09. (There are some minor questions about that on ‘Sarcastrophe’ and ‘Prosthetics’ maybe, which are a bit sketchy perhaps, but for the majority of it he really, really nails it). Its also nice to see him making an effort to speak Spanish which he does rather a lot and appears really humble and grateful.

The one bit where all Slipknot concerts drag is during ‘Spit It Out’ when the band get all the audience to squat down so they can all jump (the fuck) up at the same key moment. The actual process of cajoling them all to squat down can be a bit boring to watch or listen to if you aren’t actually there yourself sometimes, but luckily here it really doesn’t drag on too long and they payoff is great; the image of the gigantic Mexican crowd all bouncing in unison is really rather impressive.

So just to go through the list: It looks great. It sounds great. The band play great. The setlist is different enough from previous live releases to be worth it. That setlist itself is also pretty great, doing a good job of pleasing fans with the songs they’d expect to hear (Old fans could never see a set without ‘(sic)’ or ‘Surfacing’ and newer fans would never accept a set without ‘Duality’ and ‘Psychosocial’ for example) with pleasing them by spicing things up a bit and not just repeating themselves every time. On a personal note as well, its just so damn nice that they played ‘Metabolic’ live. I’ve been banging on for years about it and how its my favourite Slipknot song and they’ve finally put it out on something. I’m very pleased about that. Underrated song!

Anyway, that’s just personal preference. Everyone has their pros and cons to any setlist by any band. I’m sure some people are gutted ‘Sulfur’ and ‘Left Behind’ are missing considering they were big singles. I myself am kind of surprised ‘Skeptic’ is missing. With its catchy-ass chorus its absolutely built for big audience sing-alongs. I’d have thought that would be in every live set ever following Paul’s death, but I guess maybe its too personal for them lyrically or something like that.

Overall; this is a damn fine release from the band and not one to miss out on. Not even if you’ve already got a lot of live material by them already, as discussed at the beginning. Its probably their best video album on purely video terms, and its really worthy of inclusion in your collection in the other aspects like tracklisting and performance. If you are desperate to see the documentary, don’t get this version, but if you, like me, only really want the concert then this is the perfect version (at the lowest price).

GREEN JELLŸ Cereal Killer

Movie · 1992 · Alternative Metal
Cover art Buy this album from MMA partners
Unitron
What would happen if Art Clokey, Jim Henson, and Gerry Anderson got together and created some films while on a sick acid trip?

Most likely, Cereal Killer would be created.

Green JellŸ, known as Green Jello at this time before they had to change the name, was probably one of the only bands to make a "video-music album". Yeah, you can go listen to the "Cereal Killer Soundtrack", but you really won't get the same experience. These songs don't really work unless you're watching the utterly ridiculous and zany videos along with them. The videos contain all sorts of use of claymation, puppetry, and weird costumes backed by a soundtrack blending thrash metal, hardcore punk, funk metal, classic heavy metal, and whatever else they wanted to make.

Oh, I forgot to mention that the lyrics are completely absurd along with the videos. You have their famous "Three Little Pigs", which is about a rocking pig, stoned pig, rich pig, and Rambo gunning down the big bad wolf. The title cut is about cereal mascots going to war, with the FruitLoops toucan slaughtering all the other mascots. Finally, the cover of Sex Pistols' "Anarchy in the U.K." is about the town of Bedrock from The Flintstones with the lyrics of 'Want to destroy Mr. Slate, Cause I wanna be Fred Flintstone'.

If you just want to hear some good music, there's always the soundtrack. However, if you want a good laugh at a party, invite your friends to come watch Cereal Killer. This is a hilarious metal musical for all to see.

Hope you found this review helpful, feel free to comment!

SLIPKNOT (sic)nesses

Movie · 2010 · Nu Metal
Cover art Buy this album from MMA partners
Kingcrimsonprog
Most Slipknot fans won’t need very much convincing, a new live DVD has been released an you very probably plan t buy it, but for anyone on the fence about whether or not to get it, I highly recommend this package, on is own merits and not just out of blind dedication to the band.

‘(sic)nesses,’ is a pretty great package, documenting their 2009 headline performance at the UK’s Download Festival in front of 80,000 excited fans. Also included is a documentary (curiously on disc one, with the concert on disc 2) from Shaun ‘Clown,’ Crahan and all the music videos from the band’s ‘All Hope Is Gone,’ album cycle.

Performance wise, everything you expect to happen at a Slipknot concert is there, so don’t expect to be disappointed in that regard. One can expect to see people hanging off things, jumping off things and throwing things at regular intervals; in addition to a spinning in mid air drum kit, Different band members fretting the notes for the guitarists, different band members hitting a keg with a baseball bat, Clown and Criss’s strap-on marching drums during ‘The Blister Exists,’ and ‘Psycho Social,’ and of course Sid getting into the midst of everything, including the crowd whenever possible.

Without a doubt the entire concert is made on the strength of the crowds passionate reaction and that undefinable live energy that just makes the concert feel amazing. Seeing 80,000 plus people singing along to very heavy music is almost life affirming.

If you were dissapointed by the band’s live performances on their live album ‘9.0 Live,’ or the bonus live material from ‘Voliminal,’ specifically the mix, Corey’s vocals and the disjointed feeling caused from material being taken from various concerts and are unsure whether or not to buy ‘(sic)nesses,’ then I’d like to reassure you that it is of a much higher quality than the previously mentioned releases, the whole concert is much more impressive and intense, Corey’s vocal performance is noticeably stronger and the mix is a lot more suitable.

The audiovisual quality of the release is in absolutely no question, the tech crew behind it have done an absolutely sterling job recording, mixing, filming and editing it and the whole viewing experience is of as high a quality as you would expect from a band of Slipknot’s size, even considering that this was a festival performance which is where a lot of big bands release their weaker DVDs due to the reduced amount of control available. Put simply this DVD looks and sounds fantastic, better even than you’d expect.

The only negative things I have to say are mere nitpicking, such as a perceived shortage of material from the ‘Iowa,’ album and that the documentary is very much in the Shaun Crahan style (as seen on the main Voliminal film and the All Hope is Gone bonus DVD) which I don’t personally care for but of course, you could indeed love this style. These minor and circumstantial niggles do nothing to detract from the sheer quality of the release. It may sound cheesy, but ‘(sic)nesses,’ proves why people love Slipknot so much.

MUDVAYNE All Access to All Things

Movie · 2003 · Nu Metal
Cover art Buy this album from MMA partners
Kingcrimsonprog
Mudvayne’s second concert DVD, All Access To All Things features performances from Metallica’s 2003 Summer Sanitarium tour; filmed across three shows at three locations, Seattle, Salt Lake City and San Francisco. The DVD features 50 minutes worth of live performances adding up to a total of ten songs as well as forty minutes of behind the scenes footage like interviews on the tour bus or in the dressing room as well as the making of their music video for ‘World So Cold,’ which is available as a bonus feature.

The performances are of a pretty great quality and the sound and visuals are of an acceptable standard. The two greatest faults are that the bass drum sound is rather poor, but this is to be expected at a big outdoor show and is made up for by the fact that the rest of the sound is very good. The other flaw is that on about three songs, the editing becomes distracting for about a minute or so when it is decided that a bunch of really quick cuts are necessary.

Apart from these two minor flaws, All Access to All Things is an enjoyable DVD worthy of a place in any Mudvayne fan’s collection. The performances are tight, the behind the scenes sections are relatively interesting, (but thankfully you are given the option to watch just the concert, which is great for repeat viewings) and the track listing is good. Matt, Greg and Ryan absolutely nail every second of the performance, playing both tightly and energetically, and Chad adds some brilliant improvised vocals at the end of ‘Nothing To Gein,’ and ‘World So Cold,’

Chad can really pull it off live, delivering the clean vocals really well and the heavier vocals almost as well with very few exceptions, chiefly on the faster songs from LD.50 where it would be impossible for anyone to sing that fast, that close together without losing their breath. On this DVD the band appear without the make up which was the trademark of their early career and are playing in daylight at big outdoor events across three different shows.

If this is not to your tastes, you may want to consider Mudvayne’s first concert DVD ‘Live In Peoria,’ which features the band wearing makeup, indoors in a smaller venue, at night and all from a single concert.

In summary; if you don’t mind that the live sections are not from one single concert and can forgive the bass drum sound, you will find a very enjoyable DVD that stands up even now.

FAITH NO MORE You Fat Bastards / Who Cares A Lot?

Movie · 2006 · Alternative Metal
Cover art Buy this album from MMA partners
Stooge
The Brixton Academy show captures the band in 1990, just as they were beginning to explode in an “Epic” fashion. Supporting their 1989 release “The Real Thing”, the setlist contains all but “Surprise! You’re Dead!” and “The Morning After” from that album. Two tracks from the pre-Patton era are performed “As The Worm Turns” and “We Care A Lot”, both of which are a good fit with Patton’s voice. This concert is well shot, and the band performs great. It makes me wish for a more extended Faith No More show to be released in the future.

The other part of the package is mainly to showcase their promotional videos. Music video compilations aren’t normally my cup of tea, but at least they integrate some other things into the mix to keep it interesting. You get snippets of interviews, behind the scenes footage, and outtakes to bridge some of the music videos. The music videos span going all the way to the Chuck Mosely days through to Album of the Year, ranging in quality to low budget/amateur rank (“Everything’s Ruined”, the Mosely era ones) to great production values (“Stripsearch”). However, I believe there are some official videos missing from the collection (“Ricochet” comes to mind). I guess having “Greatest Videos” in the title covers their a$$es in that regard.

This is a great package for those new to Faith No More, and it has strong re-play value.

Artists with Alternative Metal release(s)

alternative metal Index

Member Zone

Username:
Password:
Stay signed in

Metal Subgenres

Artists Alpha-index

MMA TOP 5 Metal ALBUMS

Rating by members, ranked by custom algorithm
Albums with 30 ratings and more
Master of Puppets Thrash Metal
METALLICA
Buy this album from our partners
Moving Pictures Hard Rock
RUSH
Buy this album from our partners
Powerslave NWoBHM
IRON MAIDEN
Buy this album from our partners
Keeper of the Seven Keys Part II Power Metal
HELLOWEEN
Buy this album from our partners
Rust in Peace Thrash Metal
MEGADETH
Buy this album from our partners

New Metal Artists

New Metal Releases

爱,幻灭 Metalcore
DYING TONIGHT
Buy this album from MMA partners
Natur Hardcore Punk
ONDT BLOD
Buy this album from MMA partners
Monumentti Depressive Black Metal
KUILU
Buy this album from MMA partners
Geometria Avant-garde Metal
THY CATAFALQUE
Buy this album from MMA partners
And Justice for None Groove Metal
FIVE FINGER DEATH PUNCH
Buy this album from MMA partners
More new releases

New Metal Online Videos

Adversvm - Aion Sitra Ahra
ADVERSVM
Sisslith· 4 days ago
Easy Money
KING CRIMSON
Tupan· 5 days ago
King Crimson - Fracture (OFFICIAL)
KING CRIMSON
Tupan· 5 days ago
Heroes - King Crimson Live in Berlin
KING CRIMSON
Tupan· 5 days ago
More videos

New MMA Metal Forum Topics

More in the forums

New Site interactions

More...

Latest Metal News

members-submitted

More in the forums

Social Media

Follow us

Buy Metal Music Online