JUDAS PRIEST

Heavy Metal / Power Metal / Groove Metal / Hard Rock • United Kingdom
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Judas Priest is a British heavy metal band formed in Birmingham, England in 1969. Known for twin lead guitars, a wide operatic vocal style, and for introducing the S&M leather-and-studs look into heavy metal, they have sold over 50 million albums worldwide. After an early career as a secondary act dogged by unsympathetic producers and line-up changes, the band found considerable commercial success in the 1980s. In 1989, they were named as defendants in an unsuccessful lawsuit alleging that subliminal messages on their albums had caused the suicide attempts of two young men. The band's membership has seen much turnover, including a revolving cast of drummers in the 1970s, and the temporary departure of singer Rob Halford in the early 1990s. The current line-up consists of lead vocalist Rob Halford, guitarists Glenn Tipton and Richie Faulkner, bassist Ian Hill, and drummer Scott Travis. The band's best-selling album is 1982's Screaming read more...
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JUDAS PRIEST Discography

JUDAS PRIEST albums / top albums

JUDAS PRIEST Rocka Rolla album cover 3.58 | 89 ratings
Rocka Rolla
Hard Rock 1974
JUDAS PRIEST Sad Wings Of Destiny album cover 4.46 | 158 ratings
Sad Wings Of Destiny
Heavy Metal 1976
JUDAS PRIEST Sin After Sin album cover 3.92 | 111 ratings
Sin After Sin
Heavy Metal 1977
JUDAS PRIEST Stained Class album cover 4.11 | 119 ratings
Stained Class
Heavy Metal 1978
JUDAS PRIEST Killing Machine album cover 3.87 | 94 ratings
Killing Machine
Heavy Metal 1978
JUDAS PRIEST British Steel album cover 3.95 | 120 ratings
British Steel
Heavy Metal 1980
JUDAS PRIEST Point Of Entry album cover 2.96 | 83 ratings
Point Of Entry
Heavy Metal 1981
JUDAS PRIEST Screaming For Vengeance album cover 4.17 | 125 ratings
Screaming For Vengeance
Heavy Metal 1982
JUDAS PRIEST Defenders Of The Faith album cover 4.06 | 107 ratings
Defenders Of The Faith
Heavy Metal 1984
JUDAS PRIEST Turbo album cover 3.15 | 85 ratings
Turbo
Heavy Metal 1986
JUDAS PRIEST Ram It Down album cover 3.27 | 78 ratings
Ram It Down
Heavy Metal 1988
JUDAS PRIEST Painkiller album cover 4.45 | 140 ratings
Painkiller
Power Metal 1990
JUDAS PRIEST Jugulator album cover 3.25 | 57 ratings
Jugulator
Groove Metal 1997
JUDAS PRIEST Demolition album cover 2.75 | 42 ratings
Demolition
Heavy Metal 2001
JUDAS PRIEST Angel Of Retribution album cover 3.70 | 71 ratings
Angel Of Retribution
Heavy Metal 2005
JUDAS PRIEST Nostradamus album cover 3.20 | 72 ratings
Nostradamus
Heavy Metal 2008
JUDAS PRIEST Redeemer Of Souls album cover 3.63 | 35 ratings
Redeemer Of Souls
Heavy Metal 2014
JUDAS PRIEST Firepower album cover 3.99 | 29 ratings
Firepower
Heavy Metal 2018

JUDAS PRIEST EPs & splits

JUDAS PRIEST live albums

JUDAS PRIEST Unleashed In The East album cover 4.22 | 53 ratings
Unleashed In The East
Heavy Metal 1979
JUDAS PRIEST Priest... Live! album cover 3.90 | 31 ratings
Priest... Live!
Heavy Metal 1987
JUDAS PRIEST '98 Live Meltdown album cover 3.50 | 13 ratings
'98 Live Meltdown
Heavy Metal 1998
JUDAS PRIEST Live In London album cover 3.50 | 5 ratings
Live In London
Heavy Metal 2003
JUDAS PRIEST A Touch Of Evil album cover 3.65 | 10 ratings
A Touch Of Evil
Heavy Metal 2009
JUDAS PRIEST Battle Cry album cover 3.67 | 3 ratings
Battle Cry
Heavy Metal 2016

JUDAS PRIEST demos, promos, fans club and other releases (no bootlegs)

JUDAS PRIEST re-issues & compilations

JUDAS PRIEST The Best Of Judas Priest album cover 4.50 | 2 ratings
The Best Of Judas Priest
Heavy Metal 1978
JUDAS PRIEST Hero, Hero album cover 4.05 | 7 ratings
Hero, Hero
Heavy Metal 1981
JUDAS PRIEST Metal Works '73-'93 album cover 4.59 | 13 ratings
Metal Works '73-'93
Heavy Metal 1993
JUDAS PRIEST Prisoners Of Pain album cover 3.75 | 2 ratings
Prisoners Of Pain
Heavy Metal 1996
JUDAS PRIEST The Beast Of album cover 0.00 | 0 ratings
The Beast Of
Heavy Metal 1996
JUDAS PRIEST The Best Of Judas Priest: Living After Midnight album cover 4.67 | 3 ratings
The Best Of Judas Priest: Living After Midnight
Heavy Metal 1997
JUDAS PRIEST Priest Live & Rare album cover 5.00 | 1 ratings
Priest Live & Rare
Heavy Metal 1998
JUDAS PRIEST Simply The Best album cover 4.00 | 2 ratings
Simply The Best
Heavy Metal 1999
JUDAS PRIEST Genocide album cover 5.00 | 2 ratings
Genocide
Heavy Metal 2000
JUDAS PRIEST The Re-Masters album cover 4.00 | 1 ratings
The Re-Masters
Heavy Metal 2001
JUDAS PRIEST Deliverin' The Goods album cover 4.00 | 1 ratings
Deliverin' The Goods
Heavy Metal 2002
JUDAS PRIEST Secrets From The Vault album cover 2.50 | 1 ratings
Secrets From The Vault
Heavy Metal 2002
JUDAS PRIEST Metalogy album cover 4.50 | 2 ratings
Metalogy
Heavy Metal 2004
JUDAS PRIEST The Essential Judas Priest album cover 4.33 | 6 ratings
The Essential Judas Priest
Heavy Metal 2006
JUDAS PRIEST Collections album cover 4.00 | 1 ratings
Collections
Heavy Metal 2008
JUDAS PRIEST Playlist: The Very Best Of Judas Priest album cover 4.00 | 1 ratings
Playlist: The Very Best Of Judas Priest
Heavy Metal 2008
JUDAS PRIEST Setlist: The Very Best Of Judas Priest album cover 0.00 | 0 ratings
Setlist: The Very Best Of Judas Priest
Heavy Metal 2010
JUDAS PRIEST The Music Of Judas Priest album cover 0.00 | 0 ratings
The Music Of Judas Priest
Heavy Metal 2010
JUDAS PRIEST The Chosen Few album cover 5.00 | 1 ratings
The Chosen Few
Heavy Metal 2011
JUDAS PRIEST Single Cuts album cover 0.00 | 0 ratings
Single Cuts
Heavy Metal 2011
JUDAS PRIEST The Complete Albums Collection album cover 4.50 | 1 ratings
The Complete Albums Collection
Heavy Metal 2012

JUDAS PRIEST singles (37)

.. Album Cover
3.12 | 4 ratings
Rocka Rolla
Hard Rock 1974
.. Album Cover
4.00 | 3 ratings
Tyrant
Heavy Metal 1976
.. Album Cover
4.00 | 3 ratings
The Ripper
Heavy Metal 1976
.. Album Cover
4.00 | 3 ratings
Diamonds And Rust
Heavy Metal 1977
.. Album Cover
4.25 | 4 ratings
Dissident Aggressor
Heavy Metal 1977
.. Album Cover
4.00 | 3 ratings
Better By You, Better By Me
Heavy Metal 1978
.. Album Cover
3.50 | 2 ratings
Evening Star
Heavy Metal 1978
.. Album Cover
3.83 | 3 ratings
Before The Dawn
Heavy Metal 1978
.. Album Cover
2.00 | 1 ratings
Take On The World
Heavy Metal 1979
.. Album Cover
3.50 | 2 ratings
Rock Forever
Heavy Metal 1979
.. Album Cover
3.33 | 3 ratings
Living After Midnight
Heavy Metal 1980
.. Album Cover
3.50 | 2 ratings
Breaking The Law
Heavy Metal 1980
.. Album Cover
3.83 | 3 ratings
United
Heavy Metal 1980
.. Album Cover
3.50 | 2 ratings
Don’t Go
Heavy Metal 1981
.. Album Cover
3.50 | 2 ratings
Hot Rockin'
Heavy Metal 1981
.. Album Cover
3.50 | 2 ratings
Heading Out To The Highway
Heavy Metal 1981
.. Album Cover
4.00 | 4 ratings
You've Got Another Thing Comin'
Heavy Metal 1982
.. Album Cover
4.00 | 3 ratings
(Take These) Chains
Heavy Metal 1982
.. Album Cover
4.00 | 4 ratings
Freewheel Burning
Heavy Metal 1983
.. Album Cover
3.67 | 3 ratings
Some Heads Are Gonna Roll
Heavy Metal 1984
.. Album Cover
3.83 | 3 ratings
Love Bites
Heavy Metal 1984
.. Album Cover
3.00 | 2 ratings
Locked In
Heavy Metal 1986
.. Album Cover
4.00 | 3 ratings
Turbo Lover
Heavy Metal 1986
.. Album Cover
3.17 | 3 ratings
Parental Guidance
Heavy Metal 1986
.. Album Cover
3.88 | 4 ratings
Ram It Down / Heavy Metal
Heavy Metal 1988
.. Album Cover
2.90 | 5 ratings
Johnny B. Goode
Heavy Metal 1988
.. Album Cover
4.00 | 3 ratings
A Touch Of Evil
Power Metal 1990
.. Album Cover
4.00 | 3 ratings
Painkiller
Power Metal 1990
.. Album Cover
3.83 | 3 ratings
Night Crawler
Power Metal 1993
.. Album Cover
2.00 | 1 ratings
Burn In Hell
Groove Metal 1997
.. Album Cover
2.00 | 1 ratings
Bullet Train
Groove Metal 1998
.. Album Cover
2.00 | 1 ratings
Machine Man
Heavy Metal 2001
.. Album Cover
2.00 | 1 ratings
Revolution
Heavy Metal 2005
.. Album Cover
3.25 | 2 ratings
Worth Fighting For
Heavy Metal 2005
.. Album Cover
3.50 | 2 ratings
Visions
Heavy Metal 2008
.. Album Cover
2.00 | 1 ratings
War
Heavy Metal 2008
.. Album Cover
3.50 | 3 ratings
Redeemer of Souls
Heavy Metal 2014

JUDAS PRIEST movies (DVD, Blu-Ray or VHS)

.. Album Cover
4.25 | 2 ratings
Judas Priest Live
Heavy Metal 1983
.. Album Cover
0.00 | 0 ratings
Fuel For Life
Heavy Metal 1986
.. Album Cover
3.50 | 2 ratings
Priest...Live!
Heavy Metal 1987
.. Album Cover
4.50 | 1 ratings
Metal Works '73-'93
Heavy Metal 1993
.. Album Cover
0.00 | 0 ratings
Painkiller
Heavy Metal 1993
.. Album Cover
4.00 | 1 ratings
British Steel
Heavy Metal 2001
.. Album Cover
3.50 | 1 ratings
Live In London
Heavy Metal 2002
.. Album Cover
4.25 | 2 ratings
Electric Eye
Heavy Metal 2003
.. Album Cover
4.08 | 14 ratings
Rising In The East
Heavy Metal 2005
.. Album Cover
4.66 | 12 ratings
Live Vengeance '82
Heavy Metal 2006
.. Album Cover
3.00 | 1 ratings
Epitaph
Heavy Metal 2013

JUDAS PRIEST Reviews

JUDAS PRIEST Ram It Down

Album · 1988 · Heavy Metal
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Warthur
Judas Priest had spent much of the 1980s balancing more hard-edged material with poppier, more accessible numbers, at least in terms of their studio output. Their live shows from the era showed how their more radio-friendly material could really get an extra bit of grit to it when given a more muscular spin, so it's clear where their hearts actually lay - but you can't blame them for catching the wave of metal's commercial peak when they could and securing their future to allow them to keep at their craft going forwards.

Still, it was evident from Turbo that they'd gone about as far in the pop-metal direction as they viably could. It would be on Painkiller that they'd produce a furious metal release which showed that they'd lost none of their bite over the years and could go toe-to-toe with any of their younger competitors, but it's on Ram It Down that they start charting the course back there.

However, don't expect anything as thunderously heavy as the title track (or the glorious Mark Wilkinson cover art) might lead you to expect. You see, Judas Priest hadn't yet picked up the secret weapon which so refreshed their sound on Painkiller - namely, Scott Travis, whose more modern approach to the drummer's craft was the special ingredient that made that whole album come together.

At the time the album was recorded, Dave Holland was running into health and family issues which forced him to cut back his involvement and ultimately led to him leaving the band. Between Holland being exposed as a child abuser in later years and Scott just plain being a better drummer than him, Holland's departure was all for the good once it happened - the problem here was that he had one foot in and one foot out of the band, which in practice means that much of the album was recorded with a drum machine.

You can get snotty here and suggest that the fact that the drum machine could fill in for Holland without anyone noticing much says a lot about Holland's capabilities as a drummer, but I'm not inclined to be that harsh. Indeed, since we're talking an 80s-vintage drum machines here, the replacement isn't as smooth as it could be: there's a certain cold air to drum machines of this era which bleeds over into the music.

To their credit, Priest seem to recognise this and try to work with it, and the album is at its best when they do so. Blood Red Skies is a particular highlight, coming across almost as a heavy metal answer to the Sisters of Mercy. On other songs, like Love You To Death, it feels like they aren't accounting for the drum machine enough... or maybe Holland was just off his game.

Either way, there's no getting around the fact that Priest had a malfunctioning rhythm section when they produced this album, which meant that they were working with one hand tied behind their back. Considered from this perspective, it's surprisingly good - but on an objective level, it's a bit hit-and-miss, though even the "misses" here pull out something interesting sooner or later (Love You To Death picks up a bit when it speeds up towards the end, for instance). The Johnny B. Goode cover even kind of works in context!

JUDAS PRIEST Priest... Live!

Live album · 1987 · Heavy Metal
Cover art Buy this album from MMA partners
Warthur
With a track listing avoiding songs which already had an outing on Unleashed In the East, this double live album from the Turbo tour showcases how Priest were able to work their material into a cohesive setlist, despite the studio albums the songs come from having very divergent sounds - Turbo and Point of Entry don't sound much like British Steel, for instance, and Screaming For Vengeance and Defenders of the Faith sound different from those other three, but the renditions here manage to make everything sit together naturally, revealing that perhaps it was more the production approach on those albums than anything inherent to the songwriting which was responsible for the apparent divergenve.

The recent 50 Years of Heavy Metal boxed set from Priest includes a Houston show from the same tour, recorded more or less exactly halfway between the Atlanta and Dallas shows these songs were sourced from. By comparison to this show, the setlist here is fairly similar in terms of song selection and running order - bar for the trimming of the 1970s-era songs - but the Houston show sounds rawer and punchier than this rather slick presentation; comparing the two, I think Priest... Live! suffers somewhat from a slight excess of studio polishing of the live material, whilst the Houston tapes show just how heavy Priest still were in 1986.

Nonetheless, that boxed set will set you back a fair amount, and there's no guarantee the live shows on it will see an independent release, so for those for whom the box is too pricey (or just represents more Priest than they really want) Priest... Live! remains the most viable source for 1980s live Judas Priest material. And in that function, it's pretty solid. Unleashed In the East mops the floor with it - but Unleashed In the East is one of the greatest metal live albums of all time, and coming second place to it is still a good accomplishment.

Still - if they get around to putting out that Houston show independently, or if you decide to drop your money on the 50 Years box, you might find the Houston set ends up displacing this one, since it offers close to everything this does, plus more, with greater ferocity.

JUDAS PRIEST Turbo

Album · 1986 · Heavy Metal
Cover art Buy this album from MMA partners
Warthur
In all of Judas Priest's 1980s albums, a tension between their aggressive metal roots and more radio-friendly hit-making fare exists. Sure, British Steel might have the comparatively raw Breaking the Law, but Living After Midnight and United are poppier numbers. Point of Entry leaned harder on the pop-metal side of the equation, Screaming For Vengeance went easier on the pop and harder on the metal, and Defenders of the Faith found the two sides of their 1980s sound more or less in balance.

On Turbo, the scales shift way back towards the pop side of their sound, and as with Point of Entry this has meant it's not dated quite so well as British Steel, Screaming For Vengeance, or Defenders; there's a thick aroma of cheese here, with the band using synthesisers and studio treatments of their guitars more than they ever had before.

That said, I actually think it succeeds better at this than Point of Entry did. Of all of Priest's attempts to go radio-friendly, this is certainly the most polished and hookiest. Just try not to sing along to Turbo Lover, if you don't believe me. I think Screaming For Vengeance showed the best of their purist metal side at the time, but as far as forays into finely-honed, studio-enhanced, synth-infused pop-metal go, Turbo is far more compelling than a lot of the material in this sort of vein that would issue forth in the 1980s; I'd rather listen to it than the vast majority of then-contemporary glam metal or hair metal.

If it's not your thing, then sure, it's not your thing - but let's not pretend that this was some sort of unexpected, unprecedented betrayal by Judas Priest of their earlier sound; there'd been an undercurrent of this sort of accessible, sing-along stuff in their repertoire for a good long while by the time they made this, Turbo just happens to be the album where they decided to concentrate on that aspect of their sound, and I think it's for the best that the band were open to putting out albums which put one side of their sound or the other under the microscope rather than sticking right to the middle of the road all the time.

JUDAS PRIEST Painkiller

Album · 1990 · Power Metal
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SilentScream213
Painkiller. I don’t think anyone saw this coming from Judas Priest, one of the tamer metal bands, some 20 years into their career. I can’t imagine the insanity this caused when it dropped in 1990.

I can only look at it now. And now even now, it remains an absolute beast of melodic Speed Metal with more than a few of the genre’s most memorable riffs ever put to record. Halford’s iconic voice becomes a shredding cry here on a much different level than he had ever done before. The drumming flows into Power Metal territory with its constant double bass pummeling, and the guitars weave intense melodies that flirt with Thrash but lean more towards epic stylings rather than dark. And yet, the music and vocals are very aggressive, but almost upliftingly so. Perhaps triumphantly is a better word, as this album is a remarkable triumph of metal and indisputably Judas Priest’s finest hour.

JUDAS PRIEST Painkiller

Album · 1990 · Power Metal
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siLLy puPPy
There are a few certainties in life and one of those certainties is that if you are lucky enough to achieve enough life to be considered an elder that the whippersnappers who follow will always be nipping at your heel and even more so in the adrenaline and testosterone fueled world of heavy metal. JUDAS PRIEST is a metal band that needs no introduction. This band took the world by storm in the 70s by finally pulling the plug on blues based riffing and launched a heavier and more extreme version of hard rock that became known as heavy metal. While the band technically formed all the way back in 1970, it wasn’t until 1976’s “Sad Wings Of Destiny” that the PRIEST got a firm grip on its own idiosyncratic sound and once self-recognition was activated, there was no looking back.

These gods of thunder are virtually patron saints in the metal universe with one classic album after another ranking high on best metal albums of all time but after the one two punch of “Screaming For Vengeance” and “Defenders Of The Faith” which mesmerized a head banging public, the mighty PRIEST started to lose ground as younger, faster and more ferocious metal bands were gestating in the cauldron of caustic Promethean fire which fueled darker, faster and ever louder musical expressions. Bands like Metallica, Megadeth, Celtic Frost and Bathory were clearly breaking new grounds and the mighty PRIEST was looking more and more washed up with albums like “Turbo” and “Ram It Down” which were rich in creative experimentalism but lagged in execution. The lackluster performances of those two albums required a serious soul search and necessitated a methodology to reenergize and become relevant once again.

The weakest link turned out to be drummer Dave Holland who just didn’t have the magic mojo to keep up in an ever more demanding world of extreme metal and after a ten year stint as percussionist-in-chief of one of metal’s most revered bands Dave got the boot and in was a new skin abuser by the name of Scott Travis. Travis had worked with Thin Lizzy but seriously honed his chops in the Los Angeles based Racer X. He was exactly what a tired and weary JUDAS PRIEST needed in order to rekindle the magic that would kick the old JP in the arse. With Travis, long time members Rob Halford, Glenn Tipton, K.K. Downing and Ian Hill did something nobody even dared consider and that was craft one of their heaviest and most consistent albums of the band’s entire career. PAINKILLER arrived in the fall of 1990 and was the band’s 12th studio album. For those who expected another curse of mediocrity, man they must’ve been completely caught off guard with this one!

PAINKILLER took the classic style of PRIEST to the next level and made them relevant in the world of Helloween inspired power metal, lightning fast thrash metal and darkened doom-ridden death metal. Along with long time producer Tom Allom, PAINKILLER was dropped onto the metal world like an atomic bomb and still reverberates into the present as one of the crowning achievements of not only PRIEST itself as a band but as a masterpiece of metal for all time. Given Travis’ bombastic technical percussive wizardry, he forced the long time members to up their game and to their credit pulled it off with an unabashed victory. Tipton and Downing went back to guitar school to keep up with the neoclassical shredders whereas Rob Halford screamed his lungs out with amazing proficiency and vocal control. At the metaphorical eleventh hour of the band’s fading career, the gods of thunder ignited a new cauldron of creativity and raised the bar in the sound wars of the music’s world’s loudest and raucous descendent of rock.

PAINKILLER opens with the ferocious title track which immediately leaves little doubt that a new PRIEST has been resurrected from the ashes of the old and like a phoenix arising from the dying embers begins with Scott Travis pounding the living shit out of his drum set like a possessed griot narrating tales of the living dead with sounds so unruly and bombastic that the recording studio must’ve barely survived the impetuous torture that it endured. Yes, JUDAS PRIEST was back with Rob Halford shrieking like he never did before and twin guitar attacks that were on par with the fastest and most ferocious thrash and power metal of the era. If the opening track wasn’t enough to give you goosebumps, the album jets forth and never lets up for its 46 minute run. Generally speaking the first five tracks that culminate with “Metal Meltdown” display an aggressive fury characterized by ridiculously strong hooks, bombastic double guitar axe-man-ship, double bass drumming extravaganzas and a complementary bass line fury that offers a menagerie of molten metal madness.

As if an angel whispered in their ear telling them to tamp down the aggressive fury beginning with “Night Crawler” the band incorporates an atmospheric keyboard intro that sets a tone for the tale of a flesh eating monster that comes out at night and attacks with a vengeance. The keyboards played by Don Airey are fully implemented on the classic “Touch Of Evil” which offers a creepy atmospheric intro with chimes as the slower than usual track displays a completely different side of the PRIEST and unlike “Turbo” found a way to incorporate the keys appropriately into their classic heavy metal sound. The short instrumental “Battle Hymn” follows as an anthemic intro to the closing “One Shot At Glory” which finds JP in a classic 80s epic metal state of mind in the vein of Manilla Road and perhaps the most authentically sounding track of the band’s pre-PAINKILLER days although the musicianship has expanded severalfold since those days of yore and the great gods of thunder end one of their few albums of perfection. This “One Shot Of Glory” experience for the band without a doubt revitalized the sagging PRIEST like Cher’s facelift and in the process left one of metal’s most enduring albums.

Igniting the Promethean fire turned up the flames so high that so did the long suppressed tensions within the band begin to surface. After all, these guys had been playing together for well over a decade at this point with endless touring and unthinkable success. Rob Halford departed two years down the road an embarked on a successful solo career while the band morphed into the much loathed RIpper years as the alternative 90s spawned many surprises and heartbreak for long established 80s bands. But the great JUDAS PRIEST was not dead as fifteen years later Halford would return with “Angel Of Vengeance” however the momentum to follow the metal perfection of PAINKILLER would never be revived leaving this sole album as the zenith of the band’s musical prowess. It’s also well worth having the later remastered version of PAINKILLER. The bonus track “Living Bad Dreams” was recorded during the PAINKILLER sessions and presumably nixed due to lack of real estate on a 90s album but fits in perfectly with the album albeit on the slower side in the vein of “A Touch Of Evil.” The album cover depicts a secret desire we all have for some divine force to intervene and end the suffering and reign of evil that planet Earth has endured for millennia. While not exactly resurrecting the Christ consciousness, this album for a brief moment in time achieves this through the ultimate escapism. M-m-m-masterpiece!

JUDAS PRIEST Movies Reviews

JUDAS PRIEST Rising In The East

Movie · 2005 · Heavy Metal
Cover art Buy this album from MMA partners
Kingcrimsonprog
Opening with the classic double punch of `The Hellion/Electric Eye,’ you know that this concert is going to be good.

The band do their best to mix a diverse career spanning set list with playing all their biggest hits and do a pretty successful job, managing to cover a full five songs from their then new `Angel of Retribution,’ album with their big hits like `Breaking the Law,’ `Living After Midnight,’ and `You’ve Got Another Thing Coming,’ while still playing at least one song from their less famous `Point of Entry,’ `Turbo,’ and `Ram It Down,’ albums.

Musically, the band are on fire, with impressive guitar soloing, energetic on stage performances and drummer Scott Travis playing songs harder, with confidence and authority that makes them sound that much heavier and tighter. The band are playing on a fairly large stage with elaborate set pieces, risers and of course, the famous motorcycle.

Some fans have made a lot of complaints about Rob Halford’s performance here, but with the sole exception of the vocals on the track `Painkiller,’ (which, as it happens has impossibly difficult vocals to begin with) I think these complaints are pretty off the mark.

If you need proof that Rob can still reach those high notes see the `You’re Possessing Me,’ scream in `A Touch of Evil’ or indeed the entire performance of the fast and high pitched `Riding on the Wind.’

Furthermore Rob’s whole on-stage attitude is a winner, seeming genuinely pleased each and every time the crowd gets a sing along moment correct, adding little Robotic Walk gestures to `Metal Gods,’ and generally looking like he’s giving it his all, to the point where he is sweating and red in the face, not because he can’t hack it, but rather because he’s giving it his very all.

Even if you do for some reason take exception with Rob, there is simply no denying the performances of Glen, Scott, Ian and Mr. Downing who all blast away like a well oiled machine, but with the energy of a much younger band.

In terms of camera, editing, sound and mix there really isn’t anything to complain about, everything is handled well and the whole package is as slick and professional as you would hope for from a band of their size.

Overall this is a great looking and great sounding DVD from Judas Priest and that alone should have you interested, add to that an interesting set list and dismiss the complaints about Rob and you should find `Rising In The East,’ a really worthy addition to your collection.

JUDAS PRIEST Shouts

Please login to post a shout
MrMan2000 wrote:
5 months ago
While every album has some duds, every album also has a no-questions-asked metal classic. Seriously, you could put a playlist of songs from any/all of their post-70's albums and most folks wouldn't be able to tell when the song was recorded. Rightfully in the pantheon of metal gods.
aglasshouse wrote:
more than 2 years ago
I got The Best Of Judas Priest (1978) the other day, I'm loving it.
Psydye wrote:
more than 2 years ago
JP for life!
adg211288 wrote:
more than 2 years ago
Can't believe it look me so long to check these guys out. A favourite now, definitely.
666sharon666 wrote:
more than 2 years ago
It is good to see Painkiller correctly tagged here. Probably about the only site that does.

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