JUDAS PRIEST

Heavy Metal / Power Metal / Groove Metal / Hard Rock • United Kingdom
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Judas Priest is a British heavy metal band formed in Birmingham, England in 1969. Known for twin lead guitars, a wide operatic vocal style, and for introducing the S&M leather-and-studs look into heavy metal, they have sold over 50 million albums worldwide. After an early career as a secondary act dogged by unsympathetic producers and line-up changes, the band found considerable commercial success in the 1980s. In 1989, they were named as defendants in an unsuccessful lawsuit alleging that subliminal messages on their albums had caused the suicide attempts of two young men. The band's membership has seen much turnover, including a revolving cast of drummers in the 1970s, and the temporary departure of singer Rob Halford in the early 1990s. The current line-up consists of lead vocalist Rob Halford, guitarists Glenn Tipton and Richie Faulkner, bassist Ian Hill, and drummer Scott Travis. The band's best-selling album is 1982's Screaming read more...
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JUDAS PRIEST Discography

JUDAS PRIEST albums / top albums

JUDAS PRIEST Rocka Rolla album cover 3.59 | 92 ratings
Rocka Rolla
Hard Rock 1974
JUDAS PRIEST Sad Wings Of Destiny album cover 4.46 | 161 ratings
Sad Wings Of Destiny
Heavy Metal 1976
JUDAS PRIEST Sin After Sin album cover 3.94 | 114 ratings
Sin After Sin
Heavy Metal 1977
JUDAS PRIEST Stained Class album cover 4.11 | 123 ratings
Stained Class
Heavy Metal 1978
JUDAS PRIEST Killing Machine album cover 3.87 | 98 ratings
Killing Machine
Heavy Metal 1978
JUDAS PRIEST British Steel album cover 3.95 | 124 ratings
British Steel
Heavy Metal 1980
JUDAS PRIEST Point Of Entry album cover 2.96 | 87 ratings
Point Of Entry
Heavy Metal 1981
JUDAS PRIEST Screaming For Vengeance album cover 4.16 | 130 ratings
Screaming For Vengeance
Heavy Metal 1982
JUDAS PRIEST Defenders Of The Faith album cover 4.06 | 113 ratings
Defenders Of The Faith
Heavy Metal 1984
JUDAS PRIEST Turbo album cover 3.14 | 90 ratings
Turbo
Heavy Metal 1986
JUDAS PRIEST Ram It Down album cover 3.28 | 81 ratings
Ram It Down
Heavy Metal 1988
JUDAS PRIEST Painkiller album cover 4.46 | 146 ratings
Painkiller
Power Metal 1990
JUDAS PRIEST Jugulator album cover 3.30 | 60 ratings
Jugulator
Groove Metal 1997
JUDAS PRIEST Demolition album cover 2.68 | 46 ratings
Demolition
Heavy Metal 2001
JUDAS PRIEST Angel Of Retribution album cover 3.73 | 76 ratings
Angel Of Retribution
Heavy Metal 2005
JUDAS PRIEST Nostradamus album cover 3.32 | 76 ratings
Nostradamus
Heavy Metal 2008
JUDAS PRIEST Redeemer Of Souls album cover 3.65 | 39 ratings
Redeemer Of Souls
Heavy Metal 2014
JUDAS PRIEST Firepower album cover 4.07 | 35 ratings
Firepower
Heavy Metal 2018

JUDAS PRIEST EPs & splits

JUDAS PRIEST live albums

JUDAS PRIEST Unleashed In The East album cover 4.23 | 56 ratings
Unleashed In The East
Heavy Metal 1979
JUDAS PRIEST Priest... Live! album cover 3.93 | 34 ratings
Priest... Live!
Heavy Metal 1987
JUDAS PRIEST '98 Live Meltdown album cover 3.79 | 17 ratings
'98 Live Meltdown
Heavy Metal 1998
JUDAS PRIEST Live In London album cover 3.85 | 8 ratings
Live In London
Heavy Metal 2003
JUDAS PRIEST A Touch Of Evil album cover 3.87 | 14 ratings
A Touch Of Evil
Heavy Metal 2009
JUDAS PRIEST Battle Cry album cover 3.92 | 6 ratings
Battle Cry
Heavy Metal 2016

JUDAS PRIEST demos, promos, fans club and other releases (no bootlegs)

JUDAS PRIEST re-issues & compilations

JUDAS PRIEST The Best Of Judas Priest album cover 4.67 | 3 ratings
The Best Of Judas Priest
Heavy Metal 1978
JUDAS PRIEST Hero, Hero album cover 4.12 | 8 ratings
Hero, Hero
Heavy Metal 1981
JUDAS PRIEST Metal Works '73-'93 album cover 4.63 | 15 ratings
Metal Works '73-'93
Heavy Metal 1993
JUDAS PRIEST Prisoners Of Pain album cover 3.75 | 2 ratings
Prisoners Of Pain
Heavy Metal 1996
JUDAS PRIEST The Beast Of album cover 0.00 | 0 ratings
The Beast Of
Heavy Metal 1996
JUDAS PRIEST The Best Of Judas Priest: Living After Midnight album cover 4.50 | 4 ratings
The Best Of Judas Priest: Living After Midnight
Heavy Metal 1997
JUDAS PRIEST Priest Live & Rare album cover 5.00 | 1 ratings
Priest Live & Rare
Heavy Metal 1998
JUDAS PRIEST Simply The Best album cover 4.00 | 2 ratings
Simply The Best
Heavy Metal 1999
JUDAS PRIEST Genocide album cover 5.00 | 2 ratings
Genocide
Heavy Metal 2000
JUDAS PRIEST The Re-Masters album cover 4.00 | 1 ratings
The Re-Masters
Heavy Metal 2001
JUDAS PRIEST Deliverin' The Goods album cover 4.00 | 1 ratings
Deliverin' The Goods
Heavy Metal 2002
JUDAS PRIEST Secrets From The Vault album cover 2.50 | 1 ratings
Secrets From The Vault
Heavy Metal 2002
JUDAS PRIEST Metalogy album cover 4.50 | 2 ratings
Metalogy
Heavy Metal 2004
JUDAS PRIEST The Essential Judas Priest album cover 4.33 | 6 ratings
The Essential Judas Priest
Heavy Metal 2006
JUDAS PRIEST Collections album cover 4.00 | 1 ratings
Collections
Heavy Metal 2008
JUDAS PRIEST Playlist: The Very Best Of Judas Priest album cover 4.00 | 1 ratings
Playlist: The Very Best Of Judas Priest
Heavy Metal 2008
JUDAS PRIEST Setlist: The Very Best Of Judas Priest album cover 0.00 | 0 ratings
Setlist: The Very Best Of Judas Priest
Heavy Metal 2010
JUDAS PRIEST The Music Of Judas Priest album cover 0.00 | 0 ratings
The Music Of Judas Priest
Heavy Metal 2010
JUDAS PRIEST The Chosen Few album cover 4.50 | 2 ratings
The Chosen Few
Heavy Metal 2011
JUDAS PRIEST Single Cuts album cover 4.75 | 2 ratings
Single Cuts
Heavy Metal 2011
JUDAS PRIEST The Complete Albums Collection album cover 4.50 | 1 ratings
The Complete Albums Collection
Heavy Metal 2012

JUDAS PRIEST singles (37)

.. Album Cover
3.12 | 4 ratings
Rocka Rolla
Hard Rock 1974
.. Album Cover
4.00 | 3 ratings
Tyrant
Heavy Metal 1976
.. Album Cover
4.00 | 3 ratings
The Ripper
Heavy Metal 1976
.. Album Cover
4.00 | 3 ratings
Diamonds And Rust
Heavy Metal 1977
.. Album Cover
4.25 | 4 ratings
Dissident Aggressor
Heavy Metal 1977
.. Album Cover
4.00 | 3 ratings
Better By You, Better By Me
Heavy Metal 1978
.. Album Cover
3.50 | 2 ratings
Evening Star
Heavy Metal 1978
.. Album Cover
3.83 | 3 ratings
Before The Dawn
Heavy Metal 1978
.. Album Cover
3.50 | 2 ratings
Take On The World
Heavy Metal 1979
.. Album Cover
3.50 | 2 ratings
Rock Forever
Heavy Metal 1979
.. Album Cover
3.33 | 3 ratings
Living After Midnight
Heavy Metal 1980
.. Album Cover
3.50 | 2 ratings
Breaking The Law
Heavy Metal 1980
.. Album Cover
4.00 | 3 ratings
United
Heavy Metal 1980
.. Album Cover
3.50 | 2 ratings
Don’t Go
Heavy Metal 1981
.. Album Cover
3.50 | 2 ratings
Hot Rockin'
Heavy Metal 1981
.. Album Cover
3.50 | 2 ratings
Heading Out To The Highway
Heavy Metal 1981
.. Album Cover
4.00 | 4 ratings
You've Got Another Thing Comin'
Heavy Metal 1982
.. Album Cover
4.00 | 3 ratings
(Take These) Chains
Heavy Metal 1982
.. Album Cover
4.00 | 4 ratings
Freewheel Burning
Heavy Metal 1983
.. Album Cover
3.67 | 3 ratings
Some Heads Are Gonna Roll
Heavy Metal 1984
.. Album Cover
3.83 | 3 ratings
Love Bites
Heavy Metal 1984
.. Album Cover
3.00 | 2 ratings
Locked In
Heavy Metal 1986
.. Album Cover
4.00 | 3 ratings
Turbo Lover
Heavy Metal 1986
.. Album Cover
3.17 | 3 ratings
Parental Guidance
Heavy Metal 1986
.. Album Cover
3.88 | 4 ratings
Ram It Down / Heavy Metal
Heavy Metal 1988
.. Album Cover
2.90 | 5 ratings
Johnny B. Goode
Heavy Metal 1988
.. Album Cover
4.00 | 3 ratings
A Touch Of Evil
Power Metal 1990
.. Album Cover
4.00 | 3 ratings
Painkiller
Power Metal 1990
.. Album Cover
3.83 | 3 ratings
Night Crawler
Power Metal 1993
.. Album Cover
2.00 | 1 ratings
Burn In Hell
Groove Metal 1997
.. Album Cover
2.00 | 1 ratings
Bullet Train
Groove Metal 1998
.. Album Cover
2.00 | 1 ratings
Machine Man
Heavy Metal 2001
.. Album Cover
2.00 | 1 ratings
Revolution
Heavy Metal 2005
.. Album Cover
3.25 | 2 ratings
Worth Fighting For
Heavy Metal 2005
.. Album Cover
3.50 | 2 ratings
Visions
Heavy Metal 2008
.. Album Cover
2.00 | 1 ratings
War
Heavy Metal 2008
.. Album Cover
3.50 | 3 ratings
Redeemer of Souls
Heavy Metal 2014

JUDAS PRIEST movies (DVD, Blu-Ray or VHS)

.. Album Cover
4.25 | 2 ratings
Judas Priest Live
Heavy Metal 1983
.. Album Cover
0.00 | 0 ratings
Fuel For Life
Heavy Metal 1986
.. Album Cover
3.50 | 2 ratings
Priest...Live!
Heavy Metal 1987
.. Album Cover
4.50 | 1 ratings
Metal Works '73-'93
Heavy Metal 1993
.. Album Cover
0.00 | 0 ratings
Painkiller
Heavy Metal 1993
.. Album Cover
4.00 | 1 ratings
British Steel
Heavy Metal 2001
.. Album Cover
3.50 | 1 ratings
Live In London
Heavy Metal 2002
.. Album Cover
4.25 | 2 ratings
Electric Eye
Heavy Metal 2003
.. Album Cover
4.08 | 14 ratings
Rising In The East
Heavy Metal 2005
.. Album Cover
4.66 | 12 ratings
Live Vengeance '82
Heavy Metal 2006
.. Album Cover
3.00 | 1 ratings
Epitaph
Heavy Metal 2013

JUDAS PRIEST Reviews

JUDAS PRIEST A Touch Of Evil

Live album · 2009 · Heavy Metal
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Warthur
For their first live album following the return of Rob Halford, Priest offer up edited highlights of the tours for Angel of Retribution and Nostradamus, with a focus on songs which hadn't appeared on a Halford-fronted Judas Priest live release previously. The end result is very good - Priest have always been a stellar live band - but precisely because of the approach taken in picking songs, it doesn't really reflect an actual live setlist or flow like a live show. (There's entirely undisguised fade-outs between some songs, for instance.) As a result, it's good to dip into if you really want to hear Halford singing one of these tracks live, but I don't put it on the level of their best live albums of the past.

JUDAS PRIEST Nostradamus

Album · 2008 · Heavy Metal
Cover art Buy this album from MMA partners
Warthur
As well as being the final Judas Priest album to feature K.K. Downing, Nostradamus was also the second album after the return of Rob Halford to the band. Its predecessor, Angel of Retribution, was largely an exercise in persuading the faithful that Priest were back to business as usual, after the sonic experiments of the Ripper Owens years had met a mixed reaction.

This time around, though, they seem to have felt an urge to branch out into a new sound yet again - but rather than chasing trends or meandering about in an unfocused manner, as you could accuse them of doing on Jugulator or Demolition, Nostradamus finds them chasing a distinctive musical vision which proves that merely taking the commercially easy way out was not their concern at this point in time.

Yes, it's that most Spinal Tap of prospects, the double concept album. Taking the prophecies and biography of Nostradamus as a starting point and then not allowing anything silly like restraint or the facts get in the way, the actual concept is nonsense, but that's concept albums for you: largely, the album seems to be an exercise in Priest taking a somewhat more progressive and symphonic approach to their music, complete with Don Airey guesting on keyboards (and making his presence extensively felt).

That said, don't expect a radical change. Even Airey's presence isn't necessarily that much a departure from part precedent - he'd made a welcome contribution to Touch of Evil on Painkiller, after all. As far as the prog side of the album goes, I'd be more inclined to draw comparisons to Operation: Mindcrime-era Queensrÿche than to, say, Dream Theater - it's not that they've suddenly gone super-technical on us or are throwing out challenging time signatures, it's more that they're leaning a little harder on the prog-inspired aspects of their existing sound here and there and they're trying to tie everything in to a theme.

The end result is over 100 minutes of new Judas Priest music which on the one hand is sufficiently rooted in the fundamentals of their sound to scratch your Judas Priest itch whilst at the same time different enough from what they've done before to still feel fresh. What's not to love?

JUDAS PRIEST Angel Of Retribution

Album · 2005 · Heavy Metal
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Warthur
Look, I really don't think it was Ripper Owens' fault his tenure as frontman of Judas Priest was a bit of a wet fart as far as the studio albums from that era go. The live albums he fronted proved he had the chops to handle classic Priest material, and I don't even hate Jugulator; even though it isn't an album which tries to sound much like Judas Priest, it was at least trying to sound like something. Demolition, on the other hand, was an absolute turd, the band being so scared of committing too hard to any musical direction they ended up square in the middle of the road - and ended up run over.

After that disaster, and with Rob Halford's solo career hovering at the level of "respectable, but not setting the world on fire", it was perhaps inevitable that Ripper would be making his exit and the Painkiller-era lineup of Priest would reunite sooner or later. Angel of Retribution is very much a "the gang's all back together and we're playing in the classic style you love" sort of affair for most of its running time, so don't expect Judas Priest to push the boundaries of their sound like they did on Painkiller - this is very much an album which finds Priest in their comfort zone.

Still, when you're a band as accomplished as Priest, your comfort zone can be pretty big. Within the first two songs you get a dose of their heavier side (Judas Rising) and their poppier side (Deal With the Devil), and perhaps one of the notable things you pick up early on is that they seem to be balancing those two instincts perfectly; even the heaviest moments on here have their hooks to keep you nodding along and make sure things aren't too oblique and inaccessible, and even the poppiest moments have their harder edge. This is a balance which sometimes eluded Priest even in their classic period, so it's nice to hear them finding that sweet spot here.

The major departure from that comes towards the end of the album; Eulogy is a quieter moment of the sort we'd rarely heard on Priest albums since their early days, and then the closing Lochness is the deepest they'd gotten into, if not full on prog-metal, then at least a prog-influenced epic song structure since Victim of Changes on Sad Wings of Destiny. Since they followed this with an honest-to-goodness two-disc concept album about Nostradamus, this perhaps pointed the direction in which Priest were planning to evolve their sound after this.

For most of its duration, however, Angel of Retribution isn't really about an evolution of Priest's sound - or even a Revolution, despite there being a song of that name on here - so much as it's about reasserting what Priest is all about to begin with. It does that very successfully, and whilst this means it isn't in the top tier of Priest albums (which I'd reserve for those releases where they really pushed their sound forward in a major way), it's certainly a return to form compared to anything they did in the studio with Ripper.

JUDAS PRIEST Live In London

Live album · 2003 · Heavy Metal
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Warthur
Judas Priest have always been one of the great live acts. Whilst some of their studio albums are undeniable classics, there's a few patchier studio releases where the band seemed to have lost their way - but consistently, even when that's been the case they've always offered a killer live show to reassure the world that they are still the grand masters of metal, it's just that sometimes that doesn't come across in the studio.

At no point in their career was this more true than in the Ripper Owens years. Jugulator was a decent enough album - it didn't sound much like classic Priest, but it was alright in its own way - but the following Live Meltdown went some way towards demonstrating that Ripper could handle the classics - and the rest of the band could still play them.

But at no point in Judas Priest's career was there such a vast gap between the quality of their latest studio album and that of the live album from the accompanying tour than in the Demolition era. Demolition was a strong contender for Priest's worst album ever - sure, the blues rock of Rocka Rolla and the poppy aspects of Turbo aren't universally adored in the fandom, but at least those albums had a distinctive sound of their own. On Demolition, Priest outright refused to commit to a specific sound, with the result that the album ended up a muddled mess.

But then there came Live In London, which I'll go to bat for and argue is Ripper Owens' finest hour with the band. It's from a December 2001 show on the tour supporting Demolition; within 8 months or so, Owens would play his final concert with the band, and then in 2003 he'd get the note that Preist and Rob Halford were getting back together and his services were no longer required.

You have to wonder whether Ripper knew the writing was on the wall at this point; if he did, then he seems to have been determined to go out on a high, performing with a gusto we'd already had a taste of on Live Meltdown but which he takes a couple of steps further here. For their part, the rest of Priest do a fine job on the material. Inevitably, the setlist is heavy on Halford-era stuff - they'd only done two albums with Ripper, they'd done twelve with Rob, do the math - but where Ripper-era songs show up on here, it's consistently in a version far better than they'd managed to capture in the studio. (If Blood Stained sounded on Jugulator half as good as it does here, we'd all be much happier with that album - even Demolition cuts like One On One shine here.)

The set does drag a little towards the end - United was never that good a song - and the high level of overlap with Live Meltdown is regrettable, but nonetheless this is about as good as Judas Priest with Ripper on vocals ever got.

JUDAS PRIEST Demolition

Album · 2001 · Heavy Metal
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Warthur
They say you shouldn't judge a book by its cover, but in the case of Judas Priest's Demolition the cover art actually gives you a pretty good idea of what you're in for. Stop and look at it a second, I'm going somewhere with this.

Seems kind of... generic, doesn't it? A bit low-effort. The sort of thing where if you learned that someone put a lot of time and energy into creating it, you'd have further questions about what they spent the time on, because it sure as heck wasn't invested in giving the album much of a distinct identity. You could switch out the Judas Priest logo on it for that of any one of a hundred different metal bands and the cover would be just as apt. In short, not an instance of outright incompetence, but nothing particularly interesting. Put the album on and, hey presto, that's exactly what you are hearing.

This is the second and final Judas Priest album to feature Ripper Owens on lead vocals. Jugulator has its credits, but I'm alright with it; the main problem with that album is that whilst Ripper was trying to sound like classic Rob Halford (that's how he got the job, after all!), the band didn't seem all that interested in sounding like Judas Priest, which meant there was a clash going on. Still, at least there they had a particular style they were aiming at - a sort of doom-tinged groove metal approach with perhaps a touch of Metallica influence.

Demolition, on the other hand, is a clear step down, simply because this time the band have no particular musical vision whatsoever: they're just sort of meandering around, here trying something in a more classic Priest vein, here trying something which sounds like a progression of the Jugulator sound, here a nod to nu metal, there a godawful power ballad, and so on and so forth. Some of these songs are alright but not exceptional examples of the style in question, but others are just awful - Lost and Found vastly outstays its welcome, whilst album closer Metal Messiah mixes choruses which sound like a cheap imitation of classic Priest with verses in an unappealing nu metal style, complete with quasi-rapping from Ripper which he just isn't good at.

For his part, Ripper does alright, but he seems to be hampered by the rest of the band not particularly taking into account his style as a vocalist when writing the songs. The result is that some of the songs lend themselves well to his approach, whilst others don't, and inevitably his performance is a little hit and miss as a result. (For example, the nu metal bits on Metal Messiah are not playing to his strengths at all.) As far as everyone else goes... well, it's all competently played, it's just that it isn't more than competent. Even when they take on material which is a bit more Priest-ish, they don't sound like Priest - they sound like an utterly generic metal band, drably playing material they aren't actually that enthusiastic.

Perhaps the idea was for the album to touch on a diverse range of metal genres, but the end result is that it half-asses all the styles it attempts. Every song sounds like a drab, third-rate imitation of a style someone else has done much better, and in many cases that "someone else" is "a previous lineup of Judas Priest".

It's fashionable to rag on the Ripper years, and when they include a turkey like Demolition it isn't even wrong to do so. But it would be grossly unfair to pin all the blame for them on Ripper. This clearly isn't a case where a really hot metal album got ruined because of a crappy vocalist - this is an album where a vocalist who's good at the particular thing he does but who doesn't have the level of vocal versatility of, say, a Mike Patton is trying to do his best with instrumental backing which is utterly disposable.

Let's be real: during his time in the band, Ripper was always the junior member, with every other person in the lineup having served longer in the Priest ranks than him. You can't blame Ripper for this one unless you want to think he strolled into the band and was so influential that he made all the other members lose their goddamn minds.

The main thing I'd criticise Ripper for with respect to Demolition is his utter lack of good taste: he actually thinks this is the better of the two albums he did with the group. He is wrong. Whilst the declared aim of the album was to provide something that every Priest fan could enjoy, the end result is an album which is trying too hard to please everyone to wholly please anyone.

There will likely be a few songs on Demolition you quite enjoy - but chances are they won't be songs you love, because they're too busy compromising to really chase down a particular creative vision. And for most listeners, the good parts of Demolition will likely be balanced against some parts you seriously dislike, so taken as a whole the album averages out as being utterly mediocre.

JUDAS PRIEST Movies Reviews

JUDAS PRIEST Rising In The East

Movie · 2005 · Heavy Metal
Cover art Buy this album from MMA partners
Kingcrimsonprog
Opening with the classic double punch of `The Hellion/Electric Eye,’ you know that this concert is going to be good.

The band do their best to mix a diverse career spanning set list with playing all their biggest hits and do a pretty successful job, managing to cover a full five songs from their then new `Angel of Retribution,’ album with their big hits like `Breaking the Law,’ `Living After Midnight,’ and `You’ve Got Another Thing Coming,’ while still playing at least one song from their less famous `Point of Entry,’ `Turbo,’ and `Ram It Down,’ albums.

Musically, the band are on fire, with impressive guitar soloing, energetic on stage performances and drummer Scott Travis playing songs harder, with confidence and authority that makes them sound that much heavier and tighter. The band are playing on a fairly large stage with elaborate set pieces, risers and of course, the famous motorcycle.

Some fans have made a lot of complaints about Rob Halford’s performance here, but with the sole exception of the vocals on the track `Painkiller,’ (which, as it happens has impossibly difficult vocals to begin with) I think these complaints are pretty off the mark.

If you need proof that Rob can still reach those high notes see the `You’re Possessing Me,’ scream in `A Touch of Evil’ or indeed the entire performance of the fast and high pitched `Riding on the Wind.’

Furthermore Rob’s whole on-stage attitude is a winner, seeming genuinely pleased each and every time the crowd gets a sing along moment correct, adding little Robotic Walk gestures to `Metal Gods,’ and generally looking like he’s giving it his all, to the point where he is sweating and red in the face, not because he can’t hack it, but rather because he’s giving it his very all.

Even if you do for some reason take exception with Rob, there is simply no denying the performances of Glen, Scott, Ian and Mr. Downing who all blast away like a well oiled machine, but with the energy of a much younger band.

In terms of camera, editing, sound and mix there really isn’t anything to complain about, everything is handled well and the whole package is as slick and professional as you would hope for from a band of their size.

Overall this is a great looking and great sounding DVD from Judas Priest and that alone should have you interested, add to that an interesting set list and dismiss the complaints about Rob and you should find `Rising In The East,’ a really worthy addition to your collection.

JUDAS PRIEST Shouts

Please login to post a shout
MrMan2000 wrote:
1 year ago
While every album has some duds, every album also has a no-questions-asked metal classic. Seriously, you could put a playlist of songs from any/all of their post-70's albums and most folks wouldn't be able to tell when the song was recorded. Rightfully in the pantheon of metal gods.
aglasshouse wrote:
more than 2 years ago
I got The Best Of Judas Priest (1978) the other day, I'm loving it.
Psydye wrote:
more than 2 years ago
JP for life!
adg211288 wrote:
more than 2 years ago
Can't believe it look me so long to check these guys out. A favourite now, definitely.
666sharon666 wrote:
more than 2 years ago
It is good to see Painkiller correctly tagged here. Probably about the only site that does.

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