VEKTOR

Technical Thrash Metal • United States
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VEKTOR are an American, Tempe, Arizona based thrash metal act formed in 2002. The band has so far released two full-length studio albums. "Demolition" from 2006 and "Black Future" from 2009. VEKTOR take their influences from eighties thrash metal acts such as KREATOR, SODOM, DESTRUCTION and VOIVOD but at times with a progressive twist.

( Biography written by UMUR)
Thanks to UMUR for the addition and tupan, adg211288 for the updates

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VEKTOR Discography

VEKTOR albums / top albums

VEKTOR Black Future album cover 4.05 | 40 ratings
Black Future
Technical Thrash Metal 2009
VEKTOR Outer Isolation album cover 4.16 | 37 ratings
Outer Isolation
Technical Thrash Metal 2011
VEKTOR Terminal Redux album cover 4.28 | 23 ratings
Terminal Redux
Technical Thrash Metal 2016

VEKTOR EPs & splits

VEKTOR Scion AV Label Showcase - Earache Records album cover 0.00 | 0 ratings
Scion AV Label Showcase - Earache Records
Technical Thrash Metal 2013
VEKTOR Transmissions of Chaos album cover 4.00 | 2 ratings
Transmissions of Chaos
Technical Thrash Metal 2021

VEKTOR live albums

VEKTOR demos, promos, fans club and other releases (no bootlegs)

VEKTOR Nucleus album cover 0.00 | 0 ratings
Nucleus
Technical Thrash Metal 2003
VEKTOR Demo album cover 0.00 | 0 ratings
Demo
Technical Thrash Metal 2006
VEKTOR Demolition album cover 3.17 | 2 ratings
Demolition
Technical Thrash Metal 2006

VEKTOR re-issues & compilations

VEKTOR singles (0)

VEKTOR movies (DVD, Blu-Ray or VHS)

VEKTOR Reviews

VEKTOR Transmissions of Chaos

Split · 2021 · Technical Thrash Metal
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UMUR
"Transmissions of Chaos" is a split release by US technical thrash metal act Vektor and Dutch technical thrash metal act Cryptosis. The split was released through District 19 in February 2021. It features 4 tracks and a total playing time of 20:03 minutes. Vektor are well known as one of the more prolific contemporary technical thrash metal acts and the two new Vektor tracks on "Transmissions of Chaos" actually mark a return to the scene after a longer recording hiatus following the release of "Terminal Redux (2016)" (the band´s third full-length studio album). Cryptosis on the other hand are a less known acquaintance having only released a couple of singles by February 2021. Two of the single tracks make up their contributions to "Transmissions of Chaos". They would release their debut full-length studio album "Bionic Swarm" in March 2021. They did however work under the Distillator monicker in the years 2013-2020 playing a more regular type of thrash metal and releasing a couple of studio albums under the monicker, so these guys are also pretty seasoned musicians/composers.

Vektor open the split with their two tracks "Activate" and "Dead by Dawn", and it´s immediately audible that Vektor have changed and developed their style and sound a lot in the years since "Terminal Redux (2016)". They still play their own brand of technical thrash metal (sci-fi themed and Voivod influenced), but lead vocalist/guitarist David DiSanto has opted for a different singing style to his usual high pitched screaming, and now performs more regular snarling thrash metal vocals. But as a new thing in the world of Vektor he now also performs melodic clean vocals (on "Dead by Dawn"), and the new vocal approach provides Vektor with a few more weapons for their arsenal and dare I say a more accessible sound.

The two Cryptosis tracks "Decypher" and "Prospect of Immortality" aren´t far from the Vektor tracks in terms of sound and style. Cryptosis also play a sci-fi themed technical thrash metal style with progressive elements and it was definitely a smart move by the Austrian District 19 label/management company to promote newcomers Cryptosis on this split with the more well known Vektor. Upon conclusion "Transmissions of Chaos" is a high quality split release featuring strong compositions and stellar performances from both acts, and fans of technical/progressive thrash metal should take note here. A 4 star (80%) rating is deserved.

VEKTOR Black Future

Album · 2009 · Technical Thrash Metal
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UMUR
"Black Future" is the debut full-length studio album by US thrash metal act Vektor. The album was released through Heavy Artillery Records in November 2009. Vektor formed in 2002 under the Locrian monicker but changed their name to Vektor in 2004. They released the "Nucleus" demo in 2004 and the album length "Demolition" demo in 2006. The "Hunger for Violence" demo was released in 2007, which was the last demo release before the release of "Black Future"

Stylistically Vektor play a technical/progressive type of thrash/speed metal. It´s like listening to the bastard child of Voivod and Destruction. Fast-paced and aggressive thrash metal featuring screaming high pitched vocals. The vocals are obviously loaded with effects and they sound somewhere between Chuck Schuldiner (late in his career) and Schmier from Destruction. Quite frankly they are somewhat of an aquired taste, and personally I think they are a bit hard on the ears and that they are often taken too much to the extreme (a raw sounding Mickey Mouse on helium). It´s of course my subjective opinion of the vocal style, and I´m sure others will enjoy the vocals greatly.

The instrumental part of the music is very well performed and the tracks are generally pretty long (three of them over 10 minutes in length) and features complex structures and many intriguing songwriting ideas. This is certainly progressive music. Featuring 9 tracks and a total playing time of 68:06, "Black Future" is a long album, and maybe also a bit too long for its own good. It´s not that there´s anything on the album which is sub par in quality, but about half way into the album it feels a little like you´re listening to the same stylistic elements being used again and again. The vocals don´t change much, the riffs are pretty similar on all tracks, and the atmosphere doesn´t change much either, despite Vektor´s efforts to include mellow clean guitar sections, instrumental parts, and other adventurous ideas.

"Black Future" features a raw, powerful, and well sounding production, which suits the music perfectly, and upon conclusion it´s a high quality debut album by Vektor, regardless of my personal issues with the album. A 3.5 - 4 star (75%) rating is deserved.

VEKTOR Outer Isolation

Album · 2011 · Technical Thrash Metal
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UMUR
"Outer Isolation" is the 2nd full-length studio album by US thrash metal act Vektor. The album was released through Heavy Artillery Records in November 2011. It´s the follow up to the critically acclaimed "Black Future (2009)", which really put Vektor´s name on the map. Vektor were formed under the Locrian monicker in 2003 but changed their name to Vektor in 2004. They released the "Demolition" demo album in 2006, which is often mistakenly considered their debut album. Like the case was on "Black Future (2009)", several tracks from "Demolition (2006)" have been re-arranged and re-recorded for "Outer Isolation". More specifically "Fast Paced Society", "Venus Project", and "Tetrastructural Minds".

Stylistically the music on "Outer Isolation" more or less continues where "Black Future (2009)" left off. It´s technical/progressive thrash metal with sci-fi themed lyrics and imagery. Vektor are strongly influenced by Voivod, but artists like Destruction and late era-Death also come to mind. So the music features a good balance between old school raw thrash metal and more sophisticated technical/progressive elements. The vocals are high pitched screaming which remind me of a higher pitched Chuck Schuldiner (Death) on "The Sound of Perseverance (1998)". That means effect laden and processed to the point where they are bordering inhuman territory.

The 8 tracks on the 51:43 minutes long album are all well written, intriguing, and powerful metal tracks, and while Vektor aren´t completely there yet, they are well on their way to creating a unigue musical style. Sometimes their adventurous songwriting takes them in slightly too many directions, and if I have to mention one small issue it would be that the tracks could have prospered from a few more repeated hooklines. When Vektor incorporate more instant cathiness to their music like they do on for example "Echoless Chamber", they show promise of a more compact and memorable future direction, that could get them far.

"Outer Isolation" features a powerful and raw, yet detailed and clear sound production, which brings out the best in the music. So upon conclusion this is a great sophomore album by Vektor. There´s been development since "Black Future (2009)" but not too much development (which means there is still continuety of sound and style), and "Outer Isolation" very much feels like the natural successor to the debut. As mentioned above I still feel Vektor haven´t completely found their "sound" yet, and they are clearly still in a development phase. Sometimes that´s the phase of an artist´s career, where they produce the most interesting material, but sometimes it´s just part of the journey towards something greater. In that regard it´ll be interesting to see after more album releases from Vektor where "Outer Isolation" places itself in the band´s discography. A 4 star (80%) rating is deserved.

VEKTOR Terminal Redux

Album · 2016 · Technical Thrash Metal
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The Crow
A brutal travel through space and death!

Hearing Terminal Redux is like being propelled through light years of heinous wars, apocalyptic starship crashes and obscure mythologies. The concept of the album is obtuse and difficult to understand, but also an adventure to discover, just like the music of Vektor. They proudly carry the banner of technical death metal today. And they deserve it!

The production of the album is also very solid, leaving space for every instrument. I would mention the guitars, which sound piercing and pristine, and also the powerful drums. Maybe the bass is a bit low for my taste, but that's usual in thrash and death metal anyway. But let's talk about the songs!

Charging the Void introduces us in a very powerful way in the style of the album. A very technical and fierce death metal but with tons of epic melodies, really catchy for adventurous listeners. The DiSanto vocals are pure black metal nevertheless, and they are accompanied in this song by splendid clean female choirs. A very solid, progressive and surprising song!

Cygnus Terminal is a bit more melancholic and melodic, but also powerful and it contains incredible drumming from Blake Anderson. LCD is even faster, with brutal lyrics with helps to define the concept of the record. And then comes Mountains Above the sun, a very wise track which introduces variety while being just an introduction for Ultimate Artificer, a song which is a bit more classic death metal, but it contains some of the best riffs of the album.

But hey... The second half of the CD is even better! Pteropticon is one of the most complete songs of the album with its devilish speed and brutal melodies. Is one of the best written tracks. Psycotropia increases the craziness level and it contains one hell of a bass solo. And Pillars of Sand follow the more straightforward line of Ultimate Artificer... At this point we start to feel again the album needs a change.

And then we find Collapse! A semi-acoustic and beautiful track with clean vocals which increases its intensity progressively bringing a beautiful moment when clean vocals and growls unite, making a very original and catchy section. The final part of the song is a bit more conventional, but also great. Another marvelous bass playing from Frank Chin!

Recharging the Void... If I had to introduce Vektor to someone, this would be the chosen song to do that. Over 13 minutes of epic melodies, haunting clean choirs, brutal guitars and incredible riffs. It's arguably the best song of the album and one of the highlights in Vektor's career. Just a must hearing song for every prog metal lover! Just like the rest of the album.

Conclusion: Terminal Redux has a pair of not so brilliant moments where the music can be a bit repetitive. But as a whole is just one of the best metal albums of this decade. Superb songwriting, cryptic concept and impressive instrumental skill which recalls the best technical death metal moments of the 90's while it achieves to sound different and very actual. If you are not scared by extreme metal and black metal vocals, you should give Terminal Redux a chance. It's a very impressive release from which confirms that Vektor are not the future of metal anymore. They are the present!

Thank you for this great experience, guys.

Best Tracks: Charging the Void, Pteropticon, Psycotropia, Collapse, Recharging the Void.

My rating: *****

This review was originally written for ProgArchives.com

VEKTOR Terminal Redux

Album · 2016 · Technical Thrash Metal
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Necrotica
To many, Vektor are essentially carrying the torch of modern thrash metal. It’s a completely understandable claim; the band have released three albums thus far, and each one of them has received a ridiculous amount of praise. The skeptics may deem the group a smidgen too reminiscent of Voivod, but I’d argue that the whole “progressive-thrash” concept is where that similarity begins and ends. Sure, there’s the space theme as well, but both bands deal with that idea in different ways. Whereas Voivod’s music is much more based around panic and confusion, Vektor take a more expansive and otherworldly approach to their atmosphere. That, and raspy black metal-esque vocals add a layer of extreme metal aesthetics to the prog-thrash core of their sound. Either way, whatever you may classify them as, Vektor is basically one of the most acclaimed thrash bands in years. So after Black Future and Outer Isolation, it seemed like they couldn’t take their sound any further, as well as the quality of their music.

I was dead wrong.

Terminal Redux feels like the musical equivalent of being lost in space and feeling insignificant to every star and planet around you. There’s not only an overarching darkness to the record, but such a strangely attractive beauty to it all. This is, of course, despite the amount of intense distortion and fast tempos you’d typically expect in Vektor’s chosen genre. While the beginning of “Charging the Void” suggests a frantic atmosphere to the following album, it’s soon realized that the band are especially keen on inserting moments that let the listener breathe and take in the majesty of the instrumental work. The highly melodic and catchy interlude “Mountains Above the Sun” is a perfect depiction of this, bringing a mellow respite (until the end of the track, at least) after three intense bangers. Speaking of those, I don’t think I’ve heard such a strong three opening tracks in a long time. “Charging the Void” immediately strikes with countless inventive thrash riffs, and before you know it, by the end of the song you’re hearing a goddamn choir singing along with David DiSanto’s shrieks. It’s all brought together by an overall song structure that’s highly progressive while maintaining a headbang-worthy slew of riffs. “Cygnus Terminal” keeps up with the standard of quality with a beautiful clean-guitar introduction and a few moments that somewhat borrow from jazz fusion due to the guitar chords, while “LCD” has an exceptional finger-tapped guitar motif that’s both technically impressive and appropriately spacey. One of the most remarkable things about Terminal Redux is that it never really dips in quality… and it’s 73 minutes long! Quite an astounding feat.

A big part of the album’s appeal is that, with every track, an interesting story is unfolding through David’s dense and complex lyrics. I haven’t been able to fully grasp the entirety of the tale, and the band haven’t totally explained it as of yet, but this is what I get from it: an individual comes to rule the Cygnus regime after rising to power because he found a supposed method to attaining immortality. However, considering some of the lines DiSanto delivers, the character’s views are likely controversial, most notably on “LCD” with lines like, “have them screened/we feed off their disease.” Regardless, the way the story is combined with such compelling instrumentation and vocals makes for a record that’s simply addicting to listen to. This is especially true of faster-paced songs like “Ultimate Artificer” and “Pillars of Sand,” which generate a sound more akin to classic 80s technical thrash while retaining the rest of the album’s songwriting complexity. Also, despite the tightness of the instrumental work, there’s a hint of irreverence once in a while; the climactic solo in the middle of “Pteropticon” combines classical elements with a touch of seemingly random dissonance, tapping into something more chaotic. This is one album that’s incredibly entertaining to listen to while reading the lyric booklet, if mostly to see how each stanza works in conjunction with the musical accompaniment. Of course, I can’t forget the other musicians alongside David DiSanto who make all of this possible. Erik Nelson blends with DiSanto effortlessly, and brings some experimental and even jazzy guitar leads to many of the tunes; the rhythm section of Frank Chin and Blake Anderson is also to be admired, particularly on the faster tracks which require a ton of stamina and intricacy to nail.

Everything eventually wraps up with the mindblowing closer “Recharging the Void,” a 13-minute epic that pulls together everything the album tried (and succeeded) to accomplish. The story started by “Charging the Void” comes full circle with many musical and lyrical nods to that very track. One of which is the melodic portion with the choir returning, but it’s been expanded to a full ballad portion with DiSanto showing off a beautifully calm vocal performance; in it, he sings: “All we ask is our story told.” Well the band’s story has been told. It was told in a 73-minute-long masterpiece, a sci-fi tale that’s gorgeous and compelling while being complex and brutal. I usually don’t hand out a perfect score to such new releases, but it’s the only score I can imagine lending to Terminal Redux. There’s not a single dud here, the story is exceptionally well-delivered and well-paced, and every musician is on-point. This, my friends, is a modern metal classic.

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