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"The music of the Nineties"

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Forum Name: General Music Discussions
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URL: http://www.MetalMusicArchives.com/forum/forum_posts.asp?TID=12460
Printed Date: 24 Jun 2024 at 1:32am
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Topic: "The music of the Nineties"
Posted By: Vim Fuego
Subject: "The music of the Nineties"
Date Posted: 23 Mar 2017 at 12:43am
Just found an old interview with John Zazula. For anyone who doesn't know the name, Johnny Z. was one of the early driving forces behind thrash metal, launching Metallica, Anthrax, Overkill, Testament, M.O.D. and a number of other bands. He was also a convicted conman, and a bit of a bullshit artist at times. However, in this interview from Metal Hammer, May 7-20 1990 (it used to be a fortnightly magazine), he said:

"I think that bands like Jane's Addiction, King's X, Soundgarden, the Red Hot Chili Peppers, Faith No More and Mindfunk will determine the music of the Nineties."

One of the few times Johnny Z. actually spoke some sense? Got lucky? Was still talking shit?



Replies:
Posted By: Nightfly
Date Posted: 23 Mar 2017 at 4:15pm
To an extent he was right I guess though Mindfunk didn't amount to much. This interview seems to be just before the Grunge movement took over and killed off a lot of the 80's bands, particularly the hair/glam metal bands. I never found anywhere near as many bands to get excited about in the 90's as I had in the 70's and 80's despite some great death metal. 


Posted By: Vim Fuego
Date Posted: 23 Mar 2017 at 5:43pm
I thought it was quite surprising that a guy who had been so on to it in the 80s also picked a couple of winners in the 90s too, even though the style of music had changed quite dramatically.


Posted By: Unitron
Date Posted: 23 Mar 2017 at 8:05pm
It certainly makes sense, as there was an eclecticism in the early/mid 90's that most of those bands exhibited. While nu-metal started to dominate the metal scene in the later 90's, I think metal was at a very eclectic point at the time before then. Thrash bands were still coming out with amazing albums, and it split off into groove metal which also produced many great albums at the time. Stoner metal and Doom metal were at a high point, as was industrial, alternative, and death metal.

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If I say fuck two more times that's forty-six fucks in this fucked up rhyme


Posted By: keefer1970
Date Posted: 01 Jul 2017 at 6:54am
Johnny Z's crystal ball was surprisingly accurate (well, except for Mind Funk)...

I remember reading an article in either Spin or Rolling Stone (pre-Nirvana) which predicted that grindcore would be "the music of the '90s," haha. Yeah, they sure called that one. 


Posted By: Vim Fuego
Date Posted: 01 Jul 2017 at 2:58pm
Originally posted by keefer1970 keefer1970 wrote:

Johnny Z's crystal ball was surprisingly accurate (well, except for Mind Funk)...

I remember reading an article in either Spin or Rolling Stone (pre-Nirvana) which predicted that grindcore would be "the music of the '90s," haha. Yeah, they sure called that one. 


Well, Carcass' Necroticism was declared the greatest album of the 90s by Terrorizer magazine, though it was more death metal than grindcore by then.



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